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In 2024, the Baths of Caracalla in Rome welcomed the return of water through a remarkable installation named ‘Lo Specchio’ (‘The Mirror’). This contemporary feature, measuring 42 meters by 32 meters, creates a reflective surface that mirrors the grandeur of the ancient ruins, offering a visual connection between Rome’s storied past and its present.

The pool is not an attempt to recreate the historical baths but rather to evoke the essence of the site. Cultural officials, including Daniela Porro, the special superintendent for cultural affairs in Rome, have expressed that the reintroduction of water symbolizes a tangible link to the ancient world. The installation is designed to complement the ancient architecture, reinforcing the Baths of Caracalla’s role as a hub of culture and art.

Equipped with water jets and spotlights at its base, ‘Lo Specchio’ also serves a functional purpose. It can host a stage for performances, blending the arts with this historic backdrop. The inaugural event for the public is set to be a ballet set to George Gershwin’s ‘Rhapsody in Blue,’ on April 13.

The Baths of Caracalla, constructed between 212 and 216 AD, were among the largest bath complexes of antiquity and remained operational until the sixth century. Today, the site is not only a testament to Roman engineering and social life but also a venue for operas, concerts, and contemporary art installations.

This innovative project, led by site director Mirella Serlorenzi and overseen by Porro, was brought to life by architects Hannes Peer and Paolo Bornello. ‘Lo Specchio’ stands as a modern tribute to the enduring legacy of the Baths of Caracalla, inviting visitors to experience a fusion of history and modernity.

 

Photo courtesy of finestresullarte.info, taken by Fabio Caricchia and Leandro Lentini.


Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
Buying Property in Italy – How to Get a Mortgage as a Foreigner
How to Open a Bank Account in Italy as an Expat
Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Italy, embracing the modern work culture of digital nomads, has introduced a comprehensive set of rules for non-EU digital nomads seeking to enter the Italian landscape. The interministerial decree, a testament to Italy’s progressive stance, offers a detailed guide for these skilled individuals who blend the art of living with the science of remote working.

Digital Nomads: Entry Rules for Non-EU Workers in Italy

Published in the Official Journal No. 79 on April 4, 2024, the interministerial decree outlines the rules for entry and stay in Italy for non-EU digital nomads.

These are non-EU workers who are highly skilled in smart working, utilizing technological tools to work remotely.

The law defines the procedures and requirements for entry and the issuance of a residence permit, as well as the categories of workers who fall under the definition of a digital nomad.

It implements the provisions of the Act of Conversion of the Decree Sostegni Ter (Article 6-quinquies of Legislative Decree No. 4/2022), which legally established the framework for digital nomads by amending Article 27 of the Consolidated Act on Immigration (Legislative Decree No. 286/1998).

To enter as digital nomads, neither the temporary nulla osta nor the work nulla osta is required.

As indicated in Article 3 of the Decree, entry and residence are permitted for workers who possess:

A minimum annual income not less than three times the minimum level required for exemption from health expenditure participation;
• Health insurance for medical treatment and hospital admission, valid for the national territory and the duration of the stay;
• Documentation of accommodation arrangements;
• At least 6 months of prior experience in the field of remote work;
• An employment or cooperation contract, or its binding offer.

If all requirements are met, a residence permit valid for one year and renewable is issued.

Digital Nomads: Applying for the Residence Permit

The residence permit must be requested directly from the police headquarters in the province where the worker is located, within eight working days of entering the country.

The document will be labeled “digital nomad – remote worker.”

The permit may be revoked if the necessary requirements are not maintained or if the employer has been convicted in the last five years of offenses referred to in Article 22, Paragraph 5a of the Consolidated Act.

Digital nomads who obtain a residence permit may also be joined by family members, who will receive a visa of the same duration as the worker.

Upon issuance of the residence permit, the tax code (Codice Fiscale) is also generated and communicated.

As a final step, digital nomads must also apply for a VAT number (Partita IVA).

 

For further details, please refer to the full text of the Interministerial Decree of February 29, 2024.

For assistance and advice on obtaining a visa and residence permit for “digital nomad – remote worker,” please send an email to legal@expatslivinginrome.com.

 


Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
Buying Property in Italy – How to Get a Mortgage as a Foreigner
How to Open a Bank Account in Italy as an Expat
Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

 

 

Embarking on a new life in Italy brings the excitement of exploring local flavors and the necessity of setting up a comfortable home. That’s why we’ve created this Guide to Grocery and Household Goods Shopping in Italy to help you shop like a local, offering insights into discounted prices and the most reliable home goods.

Grocery Store Chains

Coop: With a widespread presence throughout Italy, Coop offers a wide range of products, including foods, consumer goods, and household items. Known for their quality and reliability, they provide services like online shopping, home delivery, and various in-store promotions. Coop also operates under different brand names such as InCoop, ExtraCoop, and IperCoop, catering to diverse shopping needs.

Carrefour: Carrefour is a go-to destination for everything from groceries to electronics. Carrefour Italia emphasizes convenience and customer service, offering features such as Carrefour NOW for fast delivery and the Carrefour Club, which provides exclusive discounts and benefits to members. They also promote their own brand products, positioned as quality alternatives.

Conad: Enjoy the convenience of Conad’s extensive network, offering a mix of local and international products to satisfy your culinary cravings. Conad’s campaign “Bassi e Fissi” (Low and Fixed) is a long-term commitment to support the purchasing power of Italians, offering a selection of essential products at reduced and fixed prices, ensuring quality that stands up to market comparison.

Eurospin: Budget-conscious shoppers will appreciate Eurospin’s value-driven approach, providing quality products at affordable prices. The chain offers a wide range of products, including their own brands like “Fior di Natura,” focusing on healthy and natural plant-based products, and “Amo Essere Eco,” a line dedicated to eco-friendly household and personal care items. They also cater to specific dietary needs with their “Amo Essere Senza Glutine” and “Amo Essere Senza Lattosio” ranges for customers with gluten and lactose intolerances, respectively.

Pam Local: For those seeking convenience, Pam Local’s neighborhood stores offer a quick and easy shopping experience. The stores provide a wide range of products, including fresh local produce, various proteins, ready-to-eat meals, and their own brand lines like THE GOOD foods, catering to different dietary needs and preferences. Pam Local also offers easy and quick meal solutions. Moreover, Pam Local is committed to sustainability and customer convenience, with extended opening hours seven days a week and a selection of products available in mini portions to reduce food waste and save money.

Lidl: Known for its value and quality, Lidl offers a wide range of products, including groceries, household items, and weekly special offers that often include non-food items. Lidl Italia is committed to providing high-quality products at low prices, as evident in their weekly flyers that showcase various discounts and offers.

In’s Mercato S.p.a.: Explore the diverse selection of products at In’s Mercato S.p.a., where you’ll find everything from groceries to household goods at competitive prices. It is known for regular promotions and discounts, especially abundant around festive seasons. In’s Mercato also provides convenience services such as the “Prenota e Ritira” service, allowing you to reserve items online and pick them up from the store after 7 working days, which is particularly useful for busy individuals who plan their shopping in advance.

Household Goods

Furnishing your new Italian home is an exciting endeavor, and these stores offer a variety of options to suit every taste and budget:

IKEA: IKEA offers a wide range of furniture and home decor items, making it a popular choice for furnishing your new Italian home with both style and functionality. They provide various services such as home delivery, furniture assembly, and financial services tailored to customer needs.

Leroy Merlin: Leroy Merlin is a prominent home improvement and gardening retailer in Italy, offering a wide range of products for DIY, construction, and decoration. They provide everything from gardening supplies to bathroom fixtures, lighting, and tools. Their stores are designed to help customers find everything they need for their home projects, with services like free in-store pickup, home delivery, and a generous 100-day return policy. The company emphasizes customer service and convenience, with options for scheduling appointments with experts for project planning and free in-store returns. They also offer a variety of services, including bathroom renovation and installation without the need for a preliminary visit.

Tiger: Tiger stores are known for their eclectic mix of products, ranging from home decor to toys, stationery, and party supplies, all designed to bring a sense of joy and surprise to everyday life. The brand focuses on keeping prices low, making it an accessible option for those looking to spruce up their homes or find unique gifts without breaking the bank. For convenience, Tiger also provides an online shopping experience, allowing customers to browse and purchase their products from the comfort of their homes.

EuromaniaShop: EuromaniaShop operates on the concept of everything being priced at one euro. They offer a diverse selection of products and have a presence in various locations across Italy. They offer items across various categories, including household goods, personal care items, stationery, and snacks. The chain has several locations across Italy and is known for its regular promotions and discounts, especially during festive seasons.

Action Italia: Known as Action IT Store in Italy, Action Italia offers a wide range of products across various categories including home and garden, office and school supplies, DIY, personal care, electronics, fashion, food and beverages, toys, hobbies, sports, and pet supplies. They are known for their affordable prices and weekly promotions on new products.

Bricofer: Bricofer is a leading Italian company in the DIY sector, offering a wide range of products for home improvement, gardening, and construction. They boast over 20,000 products for DIY, home, and garden needs. Bricofer is known for its quality, convenience, and competitive prices, with options to purchase online, including installment payments, fast shipping, and a 30-day free return policy.

Pepco: Pepco is a retail brand that offers a wide range of products for families and homes at affordable prices. They provide a variety of items including family clothing, home accessories, and toys, with a focus on value for money. Customers can enjoy a generous 30-day return policy across all stores in the country.

Mercatino dell’Usato: Mercatino dell’Usato is a popular concept in Italy where people can buy and sell second-hand items. It’s a place where you can find unique objects that have been selected by experts, ranging from signed clothing and accessories to furniture, electronics, and more.

With these resources at your disposal, you’ll be navigating the streets of Italy like a seasoned local in no time.

 

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Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
Buying Property in Italy – How to Get a Mortgage as a Foreigner
How to Open a Bank Account in Italy as an Expat
Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

 

Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services

Renowned for its cultural heritage and economic potential, Italy is opening its doors to worldwide investors via the Investor Visa for Italy. This article delves into the intricacies of the Investor Visa, outlining the opportunities it presents and the procedures that accompany it.

Since December 2017, non-EU citizens who intend to invest in strategic assets for the development and competitiveness of the Italian System can apply for a special, biennial visa. This visa features a digital, simple, and fast release procedure.

Law No. 232 of 11 December 2016, known as the “2017 Budget Law,” introduced in the Testo Unico sull’Immigrazione (TUI) a new type of visa. This visa is valid for 2 years and is dedicated to foreign nationals from non-EU countries who intend to make a significant investment or philanthropic donation in strategic assets for the development and competitiveness of the Italian System.

Specifically, the visa may be issued for:

· An investment in government bonds of at least EUR 2 million;

· An investment in an Italian limited company of at least EUR 500,000;

· An investment in an innovative startup (startup innovativa), as defined by DL 179/2012, of at least EUR 250,000;

· A philanthropic donation of at least EUR 1 million in the fields of culture, education, immigration management, scientific research, or the preservation of cultural and landscape assets.

Procedure for Issuing an Investor Visa:

· Entirely Online: The submission of visa applications and all subsequent communications take place through the dedicated portal of the Ministry of Enterprise and Made in Italy.

· Priority: The visa waiver shall be issued within 30 days of the submission of the application.

· Bilingual: The website, application forms, guidelines, and customer care services are available in both Italian and English.

· Centralized: The Secretariat (at the General Department for Industrial Policy) is the single point of contact for the visa applicant and coordinates the inter-institutional Committee deputized for the issuance of the visa waiver.

Regulatory References:

· Testo Unico sull’Immigrazione (Legislative Decree of 25 July 1998, No. 286), Art. 26-bis;

· Decreto Interministeriale MISE-Interno-MAECI of 21 July 2017;

· Manuale Operativo.

 

The Investor Visa for Italy serves a dual purpose: it streamlines the process for significant investments to enter the nation and highlights Italy’s dedication to fostering a vibrant and competitive atmosphere. Individuals eager to contribute to Italy’s renowned cultural, educational, and innovative heritage will find their aspirations met. For further assistance or inquiries, contact  legal@expatslivinginrome.com, and begin your investment journey to the epicenter of Europe.


Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
Buying Property in Italy – How to Get a Mortgage as a Foreigner
How to Open a Bank Account in Italy as an Expat
Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

 

Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services

Rome offers a diverse range of neighborhoods, each with its unique charm and amenities. Expats moving to Rome can choose from historic centers, vibrant student areas, or tranquil residential zones. Here are some of the top neighborhoods for different expat categories:

For Families

Monteverde

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 1

Monteverde in Rome is a charming neighborhood that offers a serene retreat from the bustling city center, making it an attractive area for families. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for family life:

Affordability: Monteverde is considered to be on the pricier side, reflecting its desirability and the high quality of life it affords its residents. The cost of living here may be higher than in other neighborhoods, but many find the tranquil atmosphere and amenities to be worth the investment.

Public Transport: The area is well-served by public transportation. Families can easily navigate the city using the efficient bus services, and tram lines 8 and 3 provide convenient connections to the heart of Rome. Additionally, the Quattro Venti train station offers quick access to other parts of the city, including Ostiense and Piramide, making commuting and exploring hassle-free.

Family Activities: Monteverde is renowned for its lush green spaces, such as Villa Pamphili, the largest public park in Rome, and Villa Sciarra, with its beautiful fountains and statues. Families can enjoy picnics, leisurely walks, playgrounds for children, and various outdoor activities. Moreover, the ‘Passeggiata del Gianicolo’ offers one of the most breathtaking views of the Eternal City, and it’s a perfect spot for an evening stroll. The neighborhood also hosts cafes, and restaurants where families can savor local cuisine and partake in the community atmosphere.

Eur

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 2

EUR in Rome is a distinct neighborhood that stands out for its unique blend of history, architecture, and modern amenities, making it a great choice for families. Here’s an overview of EUR’s family-friendly attributes:

Affordability: EUR is a neighborhood that offers a mix of affordability and quality. While some areas can be expensive, reflecting the modern amenities and spacious apartments, there are also options for those with a more modest budget. The overall cost of living provides good value considering the quality of life and the services available in the area.

Public Transport: EUR is served by a robust public transport network. The area is accessible via multiple bus lines, and the metro line B has several stops in EUR, including EUR Palasport and EUR Fermi, which link families directly to the city center and other key areas of Rome. This makes it easy for families to move around the city without the need for a car.

Family Activities: EUR is home to a variety of family-friendly activities and spaces. The neighborhood boasts wide boulevards for strolling and cycling, and the iconic Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, also known as the Square Colosseum, is a must-see landmark. Families can also visit the Museum of Roman Civilization or enjoy the green spaces at EUR Park, which includes a lake for boating. The area also hosts various cultural events and exhibitions throughout the year, providing educational and entertaining experiences for both children and adults.

Trastevere

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 3

Trastevere in Rome is a vibrant and historic neighborhood that provides a picturesque setting for family life. Here’s an overview of Trastevere’s family-friendly aspects:

Affordability: Trastevere has a range of housing options, from more affordable apartments to pricier, renovated spaces. While it has become more upscale over the years, families can still find good value for the quality of life it offers. The neighborhood’s charm and character often justify the expense for those who choose to call it home.

Public Transport: Its streets are serviced by numerous bus lines, and the Trastevere train station links to the city’s main transport hubs like the Piramide metro station and Termini. The neighborhood’s central location also means that many of its attractions are within walking distance, adding to its appeal for families who prefer to explore on foot.

Family Activities: Families in Trastevere can enjoy a variety of activities. The area is known for its beautiful squares, such as Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere1, which are perfect for socializing and outdoor play. The cobblestone streets are lined with shops, cafes, and restaurants that offer a taste of authentic Roman life. Cultural landmarks like the Basilica of Santa Maria and the Church of Santa Cecilia provide historical exploration opportunities2. Additionally, the Tiber Island and the riverside are nearby, offering scenic walks and outdoor entertainment.

Parioli

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 4

Parioli in Rome is a distinguished neighborhood that epitomizes elegance and tranquility, presenting itself as an ideal locale for family living. Here’s a snapshot of what makes Parioli a top choice for families:

Affordability: Parioli is known for its upscale living standards and, as such, comes with a higher price tag. This affluent area offers a secure and high-quality lifestyle, which many families consider a worthwhile investment for the benefits it provides.

Public Transport: The area is accessible via multiple bus lines, and the nearby Euclide train station ensures a smooth connection to the city center and beyond. This makes daily commutes and family outings convenient and stress-free.

Family Activities: The neighborhood boasts several parks, including the expansive Villa Borghese, where families can indulge in outdoor activities, visit the Bioparco di Roma zoo, or explore the Galleria Borghese art museum. Parioli is also home to fine dining establishments and casual eateries, offering a variety of options for family meals. The local culture is family-oriented, with community events and activities that cater to all ages.

Prati

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 5

Prati in Rome is a refined neighborhood that combines the convenience of city living with the comforts ideal for family life. Here’s an outline of what makes Prati a great choice for families:

Affordability: While Prati is one of the more upscale districts in Rome, it offers a range of housing options that cater to various budgets. The neighborhood’s housing market reflects its popularity and the quality of life it provides. Families often consider the area’s safety, elegance, and community vibe as justifying the expense.

Public Transport: Prati is excellently connected to the rest of Rome. The area is served by several bus lines, and the Metro Line A stations of Ottaviano and Lepanto make the commute to central Rome and other key areas both quick and easy. This network of public transport is a boon for families looking to balance work and leisure.

Family Activities: Prati is known for its proximity to the Vatican and the majestic Castel Sant’Angelo, offering cultural experiences right at your doorstep. The neighborhood is also home to the lush gardens of Villa Borghese, where families can enjoy nature, visit the zoo, or explore museums. The streets of Prati are lined with a variety of shops, restaurants, and gelaterias, providing ample opportunities for family outings and dining

For Students

San Lorenzo

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 6

San Lorenzo in Rome is a vibrant neighborhood that serves as a hub for students, offering an eclectic mix of academic life and leisure. Here’s a concise overview emphasizing its appeal to the student population:

Affordability: San Lorenzo is known for its reasonable living costs, which is particularly appealing to students. The area provides a variety of affordable housing options, from shared apartments to budget-friendly studios, making it a practical choice for those studying in Rome.

Public Transport: While San Lorenzo does not have its own metro station, it is well-connected by several bus lines. The neighborhood’s proximity to Termini Station, a 15-minute walk away, offers students easy access to both metro and regional trains, facilitating travel throughout the city and beyond.

Activities: The neighborhood’s lively atmosphere is fueled by its youthful population and proximity to La Sapienza University, the largest in Europe. San Lorenzo is dotted with street art, bustling piazzas, and a plethora of bars, cafes, and eateries that cater to a student’s budget and social life. Cultural venues and community events add to the area’s charm, making it a dynamic place to live and study

Pigneto

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 7

Pigneto in Rome is an eclectic neighborhood that has become a favorite among students for its vibrant culture and affordable living. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: Pigneto is appreciated for its cost-effective living options, making it a practical choice for students. The neighborhood offers a variety of housing from shared apartments to budget-friendly studios, reflecting the area’s appeal to the student demographic.

Public Transport: Pigneto is accessible via multiple bus lines, and while it doesn’t have its own metro station, the proximity to the metro stop along Line C connects students to the rest of the city. The area’s walkability also adds to its convenience for students.

Activities: Known for its alternative scene, Pigneto is filled with street art, indie cafes, and a lively nightlife that caters to a younger crowd. The neighborhood hosts a range of bars, restaurants, and cultural events, fostering a dynamic and creative environment for students.

Piazza Bologna

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 8

Piazza Bologna in Rome is a welcoming area that strikes a balance between the lively student life and the calm of a residential area. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: Piazza Bologna offers a range of housing options that cater to students’ budgets. The area is known for its shared rooms and student apartments, providing practical and economical living spaces.

Public Transport: It is well-connected to the rest of the city, particularly with a metro stop on the B Line. This ensures that students have easy access to the university campuses and the city center, making it a convenient location for daily commutes.

Activities: Piazza Bologna has a more low-key vibe compared to other student areas, yet it still offers plenty of amenities. Students can find traditional shops, as well as a variety of dining and socializing options, all within a tranquil suburb that remains within reach of Rome’s vibrant city life.

Tiburtina

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 9

Tiburtina in Rome is an increasingly popular area among students due to its vibrant atmosphere and strategic location. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: Tiburtina is known for its relatively affordable living costs compared to other areas in Rome. Students can find a range of housing options, from shared apartments to private studios, that cater to different budgets. The presence of several university campuses nearby makes Tiburtina a cost-effective choice for students looking to minimize their daily commute.

Public Transport: It boasts excellent public transport links, including the Tiburtina train station, one of Rome’s major railway hubs. It provides easy access to both local and national destinations, making it convenient for students to travel around the city and beyond. Additionally, the Bologna Metro Station is within walking distance, offering quick connections to the city center and other universities.

Activities: Tiburtina is a lively area with a mix of cultural and social activities suited to student life. The vicinity to La Sapienza University ensures a youthful and dynamic environment, with plenty of cafes, bars, and eateries where students can socialize and relax. The district also features affordable shopping options and markets, providing a practical and enjoyable living experience for those studying in Rome.

Trastevere

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 3

Trastevere in Rome is a beloved neighborhood that captures the essence of Roman life, making it an ideal choice for students seeking an authentic living experience. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: Despite being one of the more expensive neighborhoods, many students find shared apartments or rooms that provide a balance between affordability and the vibrant lifestyle Trastevere offers.

Public Transport: Trastevere is connected to the rest of Rome, with multiple bus lines and the Trastevere train station. The Tram 8 line also runs through the neighborhood, offering direct access to Piazza Venezia and the city center.

Activities: Known for its picturesque streets and historical ambiance, Trastevere is home to The American University of Rome and John Cabot University, two large American universities. The area is bustling with cafes, bars, and restaurants that cater to a diverse crowd, offering plenty of opportunities for socializing and cultural immersion. The neighborhood’s lively nightlife and proximity to various cultural sites make it a stimulating environment for students to live and study in.

Monti

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 11

Monti in Rome is a vibrant and eclectic neighborhood that has become a favorite among students for its central location and historical charm. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: Monti offers a variety of housing options that cater to students’ budgets. While it can be on the higher end due to its prime location, students often find reasonable accommodations by opting for shared apartments or rooms.

Public Transport: The neighborhood is exceptionally well-connected, with the Cavour, Termini, and Colosseo metro stops nearby, making it easy for students to commute to universities and other parts of the city.

Activities: Monti is known for its bohemian vibe, with a plethora of vintage shops, artisan boutiques, and cozy cafes that provide a lively atmosphere for students. It’s a place where history meets modernity, offering cultural experiences alongside contemporary conveniences. The neighborhood’s proximity to major landmarks like the Colosseum also means that students can immerse themselves in the rich tapestry of Rome’s history.

EUR

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 2

EUR in Rome is a distinct neighborhood that stands out for its modernist architecture and planned layout, offering a unique living experience for students. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability for student life:

Affordability: EUR provides a range of accommodation options that can suit the budgets of students. While it may not be the cheapest area in Rome, its modern amenities and unique character provide value for those interested in living in a historically rich and architecturally significant area.

Public Transport: The neighborhood is accessible via the Metro Line B, which connects to the city center and other key locations. Additionally, there are multiple bus routes that service the area, ensuring that students can easily navigate to their destinations.

Activities: EUR is not the typical image of Rome with its grand avenues and monumental buildings, such as the iconic Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana. However, it offers a blend of history, culture, and modernity, with attractions like museums and live music venues that can enrich the student experience. The district’s proximity to the seaport in Ostia also provides additional leisure opportunities for students. Adding to this, EUR is home to several restaurants offering a variety of cuisines, perfect for socializing and dining out. The EUR Lake, also known as Laghetto dell’Eur, is a picturesque spot that adds to the area’s charm, providing a serene environment for relaxation and outdoor activities.

Trieste

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 13

Trieste is an excellent neighborhood for students in Rome, especially for those looking for convenience near metro stations. Here’s an overview of its benefits:

Affordability: Trieste offers a range of housing options that cater to students’ budgets. From shared apartments to private studios, the area provides affordable living without compromising on the Roman experience. Its balance of cost and quality makes it a practical choice for students.

Public Transport: The neighborhood’s accessibility is one of its strongest points. With several metro stations nearby, including Sant’Agnese Annibaliano and Libia on the Metro B line, students can easily navigate the city. This network connects them to universities, cultural sites, and social hubs, making Trieste a strategic location for student life.

Activities: Trieste is not just about studies and transport; it’s a district brimming with life. Students can enjoy a variety of cafes, parks, and local markets, providing a well-rounded lifestyle. The proximity to Villa Ada and Villa Torlonia offers green spaces for relaxation and study breaks.

Centocelle

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 14

Centocelle is an appealing neighborhood for students in Rome, offering a blend of residential comfort and urban convenience, particularly around the metro stations. Here’s an overview of its suitability:

Affordability: Centocelle presents a variety of housing options suitable for students’ budgets. The area is known for its reasonable rental prices, providing both shared and private accommodations that cater to different financial situations. This affordability, combined with the local amenities, makes Centocelle an attractive choice for students.

Public Transport: The neighborhood boasts excellent public transport connections, including the Parco di Centocelle and Alessandrino metro stations on Line C, and the Villini station of the Rome–Giardinetti railway. These links offer students easy access to university campuses and the city center, ensuring that they can navigate Rome with ease and efficiency.

Activities: Centocelle is not just a place to live and study; it’s a community with a vibrant social scene. Students can explore a range of activities, from historical sites like the Acquedotto Alessandrino to cultural hubs such as Forte Prenestino. The area also offers green spaces like the Archeological Park of Villa Gordiani, perfect for leisure and outdoor activities. Additionally, the neighborhood’s cafes, restaurants, and bars provide ample opportunities for relaxation and socializing.

For Diplomats

Prati

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 5

Prati is a refined neighborhood in Rome that presents a sophisticated option for those seeking a central location. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability:

Affordability: While Prati is one of Rome’s more upscale neighborhoods, it offers a range of living options. The cost of living might be higher compared to other areas, but it reflects the quality and exclusivity of the neighborhood, making it a worthy choice for those who prioritize a distinguished lifestyle.

Public Transport: Prati ensures excellent mobility with its well-connected transit system. The Metro A line and various bus routes traverse the area, offering efficient and convenient access to the rest of the city. Its central location also affords effortless reach to international embassies, government offices, and cultural landmarks.

Activities: The neighborhood is not only about elegance; it’s also about convenience and culture. Prati is close to Vatican City and is surrounded by a variety of shops, restaurants, and cultural venues, offering a vibrant atmosphere that’s perfect for socializing and relaxation after work.

Parioli

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 4

Parioli in Rome is an esteemed neighborhood that serves as an excellent choice for diplomats seeking a tranquil environment. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability:

Affordability: Parioli, known for its exclusivity, offers a variety of housing options. While the cost of living is on the higher end, it is commensurate with the neighborhood’s status and the serene lifestyle it provides.

Public Transport: While Parioli itself doesn’t have a metro station directly within its boundaries, it is served by several bus lines, providing convenient connections to key areas of Rome. One of the main bus routes serving Parioli is bus line 360, which runs through the heart of the neighborhood, connecting it to Piazza Mancini and the historic city center. This route offers residents and visitors a convenient way to reach popular landmarks such as Piazza del Popolo, Villa Borghese, and the Spanish Steps.

Activities: It is close to the lush Villa Borghese gardens and is dotted with fine dining restaurants and cultural institutions, providing a balanced lifestyle of work and leisure.

Aventino

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 17

Aventino is a serene and prestigious area in Rome that offers diplomats a central location. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability:

Affordability: Aventino is known for its elegant villas and sophisticated gardens, reflecting its ancient status as a ‘Sacred Mount’. While it is a premium residential area, it provides a range of housing options, catering to those who seek a peaceful environment without compromising on the quality of life.

Public Transport: Bus lines such as 81, 628, and 810 traverse Aventino, linking it to nearby areas and major transportation hubs. These buses provide access to popular landmarks, including the Colosseum, Roman Forum, Circus Maximus, and Termini Station. Additionally, Aventino is within walking distance of the Circo Massimo and Piramide metro stations. From here, travelers can access the Metro B line, providing further connectivity to other parts of the city. Its strategic location allows for quick travel to embassies, international organizations, and the city center.

Activities: Aventino is not just a quiet retreat; it’s also rich in history and culture. With historical sites like the Basilica di Santa Sabina and the famous keyhole view at the villa of the Cavalieri di Malta, Aventino offers a unique blend of tranquility and cultural enrichment. The presence of parks like Giardino degli Aranci provides a perfect setting for leisure and relaxation.

Celio

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 18

Celio is a historic neighborhood in Rome that offers diplomats a unique blend of ancient charm and modern convenience. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability:

Affordability: Celio, one of Rome’s seven hills, is a neighborhood steeped in history and culture. It provides a variety of accommodation options, from modern apartments to historic residences. While the cost of living may reflect its central location and historical significance, it offers a unique living experience that can justify the investment for those who value a rich cultural environment.

Public Transport: The neighborhood boasts excellent connectivity, with bus lines such as 81, 628, and 810 providing direct access to Rome’s key landmarks and transport hubs. Additionally, the proximity to the Circo Massimo and Piramide metro stations on the Metro B line enhances mobility for residents, ensuring diplomats can navigate the city with ease and reach embassies and international organizations swiftly.

Activities: Celio is not just a place to reside; it’s a destination to explore. With attractions like the Colosseum, Roman Forum, and Baths of Caracalla nearby, it offers a daily immersion into the heart of ancient Rome. The neighborhood is also home to beautiful parks, such as Villa Celimontana, and hosts cultural events like jazz festivals, providing diplomats with a balance of leisure and cultural enrichment right at their doorstep.

Monti

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 11

Monti is a vibrant and eclectic neighborhood in Rome that provides a charming option for diplomats who appreciate a mix of history, culture, and modernity. Here’s a brief overview highlighting its suitability:

Affordability: Monti, with its picturesque streets and ancient ruins, offers a diverse range of housing options. While it is a sought-after area due to its central location and historical significance, it provides a variety of living spaces that can accommodate different budgets, making it an attractive choice for those who seek a neighborhood with character and convenience.

Public Transport: The neighborhood is well-served by public transportation, with bus lines such as 81, 628, and 810 connecting residents to the rest of the city. The proximity to the Cavour, Termini, and Colosseo metro stations on the Metro B line further enhances the area’s connectivity. The neighborhood’s central location and proximity to diplomatic missions make it an attractive option for diplomats who value convenience and accessibility.

Activities: Situated near the Colosseum and Roman Forum, Monti is a trendy and cosmopolitan neighborhood that appeals to diplomats seeking a dynamic and vibrant urban lifestyle. Known for its artisanal shops, chic cafes, and eclectic boutiques, Monti offers diplomats a lively and culturally diverse atmosphere.

For Workers at Rome-Based Agencies (RBAs)

Testaccio and Ostiense

Where to Live in Rome: A Guide for Expats 20

Testaccio and Ostiense are two adjacent neighborhoods in Rome that offer a blend of traditional charm and modern urban culture, making them suitable options for workers at Rome-Based Agencies (RBAs). Here’s a brief overview highlighting their suitability:

Affordability: Testaccio offers a genuine Roman experience with a variety of housing options catering to different budgets. Ostiense has been undergoing urban redevelopment, including efforts to add color and creativity to the area, making it an increasingly attractive place to live. Both neighborhoods offer relatively affordable housing options compared to more central areas.

Public Transport: Both neighborhoods are serviced by multiple bus lines and the Metro B line, known for its proximity to the Roma Ostiense railway station, facilitating easy commutes for RBA workers.

Activities: Testaccio is famous for its food market and traditional Roman cuisine, while Ostiense is recognized for its trendy food scene and vibrant cultural life, including street art and historical sites like the non-Catholic cemetery and the Centrale Montemartini museum. Both areas offer a lively atmosphere that’s perfect for unwinding after work.

 

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Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

Italy is a paradise for hikers. While Rome gets all the attention in Lazio, there really is something for all outdoor tastes. From mountains to lakes, dunes, volcanoes, and forests – and of course, tasting the local cuisine is all part of the experience.

However, if you don’t own a car, at times it seems that certain destinations are out of reach (or you don’t want to go through the hassle of dealing with a rental car company).

Sure, there is a surprising amount of hikes available by train (check out this map), but some destinations simply require a car.

So what is the solution?

Car Sharing – is it for you?

I have tried all kinds of classic car rental companies and car-sharing providers (with ShareNow and Enjoy being the two most popular providers in Rome).

Currently, you get the best bang for your buck with Enjoy. Find below the pros and cons and decide for yourself.

Hiking around Rome if you don't have a car 21

Enjoy – Pros:

-You don’t have to deal with a car rental company. Sign up on the app once and bye-bye queues.

-You can park the car anywhere you like (that is, anywhere within the permitted area on the app) – again, no need to return it to the car rental company.

-You can use the car rental for 5 minutes, or select a more convenient “package” (e.g., for 24 hours).

-Their current fare is really good. Select a 24-hour package for €49, and you get gas, insurance, and 150km included!

-If you refill an empty Enjoy car, you get a €5 voucher.

-For iPhone users: The newer cars in their fleet (Fiat 500 Hybrid) conveniently mirror my iPhone on their display (Apple CarPlay).

-The cars come with AllSeason tires, which means you can also safely use them in winter and visit towns up in the mountains.

-You can use the reservation service, and somebody will bring a car near your location for a little extra fee.
There are many promos, and fares are even cheaper in certain periods of the year.

Enjoy – Cons:

-If you’re used to using an automatic gear, you’re out of luck. The Fiat 500 Hybrids come with shift sticks.

-Since this is a shared car, it means somebody else used it before you. If you’re a germophobe, or pick up a car after a Saturday night, you might need to clean up for a few minutes.

-The car depends on GPS signal and cellular. You can’t leave the car in an underground garage or in the middle of nowhere with no signal.

-If your journey is far beyond the 150km (if you purchased a 24h package), it can get expensive, depending on how many additional kilometers you are driving.

-If you like to return your car outside of the range defined by ENI, on their app, that is not possible. The only way to end the rental is by moving the car inside the defined area on the Enjoy app, and then terminate the rental from there.

Hiking around Rome if you don't have a car 22

Signing up the first time might take a bit longer if your driving license is not Italian, but once you get through the process, this is actually a very good alternative to renting a car to get to your hiking destinations.

As always, stay safe, stay fit, and hike a bit!
Sal

 


 

Hiking around Rome if you don't have a car 23

 

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The Torlonia Foundation in Rome is celebrating its 10th anniversary, a significant milestone that also marks the opening of the antiquarium of Villa Albani to the public from March 28th to June 28th. This event is a rare opportunity for art enthusiasts and historians alike to explore one of the most prestigious private collections of Greek-Roman sculptures in the world.

The Torlonia Foundation in Rome opens the antiquarium of Villa Albani to the public 24

Villa Albani Torlonia, Noble Casino, Photographs by Massimo Listri © Torlonia Foundation

Villa Albani, constructed in the mid-18th century, was designed to house the illustrious collection of Cardinal Alessandro Albani, showcasing a vast array of ancient art including sarcophagi, busts, and statues. The villa itself is an architectural marvel, embodying the neoclassical taste and serving as a physical narrative inspired by ancient themes.

The Torlonia Foundation, established by Prince Alessandro Torlonia, has been dedicated to the conservation and valorization of cultural and environmental heritage. The opening of Villa Albani’s antiquarium is a testament to the foundation’s commitment to making cultural heritage accessible to the public while preserving the delicate balance and integrity of the villa.

Visitors can now embark on a journey through time, admiring the classical art pieces and the villa’s gardens, which have been meticulously preserved to maintain their 18th-century grandeur. This event not only celebrates the past decade of the foundation’s achievements but also paves the way for future generations to appreciate and learn from the rich tapestry of history that Villa Albani represents.

Fill out this form to book your visit.

 

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How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
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As the chill of winter melts away, Italy awakens to the gentle warmth of spring, inviting locals and travelers alike to indulge in its seasonal splendors. From the cultural and networking events in Milan to the beautiful blooms mingled with the architecture of Rome and Florence, to the Formula 1 Grand Prix in Bologna, Italy in spring is a canvas of cultural festivities, outdoor adventures, excitement, and beauty.

What to do in Milan

A Guide to Events Happening in Spring in Milan, Rome, Florence, and Bologna 25

From left to right: Parco Sempione, Teatro alla Scala, and Milano Design Fair.

Explore the city’s parks

· Parco Sempione: This is the most famous public green area in Milan, designed in the style of English gardens and located in the city center.
· Giardini della Guastalla: A historic garden near the University and the Central Synagogue, featuring a Baroque-style fish pond dating back to 1600.
· Indro Montanelli Gardens: Milan’s first public park, dedicated to the famous journalist, offers a splendid example of an English garden with precious botanical and architectural gems.
· Parco delle Cave: Known for its naturalistic value, offering a variety of flora and fauna, and a series of ponds.
· Boscoincittà: A “forest in the city” that provides a natural habitat for various species and a place for visitors to connect with nature.

The MIA Fair 2024

Attending the MIA Fair 2024 is an exciting opportunity for photography enthusiasts and professionals alike. Scheduled from April 10th to 14th, this fair is the most important art fair dedicated to photography in Italy, offering a unique approach by presenting Solo Shows and Group Shows with specific curatorial projects. Held at the Allianz MiCo in the CityLife district, the fair is not just an exhibition but a dynamic space for cultural exchange and learning. It features a wide range of photographic works, from traditional prints to experimental image-making techniques, and includes sections like the Main Section, Beyond Photography, Dialogue, Reportage, and Beyond Reportage.

Milano Design Week

The Milano Design Week 2024 is a globally renowned event that celebrates design, innovation, and creativity. Scheduled from April 16 to 21, this event transforms Milan into a hub of creativity, with exhibitions and installations scattered across the city.

Highlights:

· Salone del Mobile: The central exhibition showcasing international designers and their latest designs.
· Fuorisalone Events: A city-wide festival with exhibitions, installations, and parties happening in different districts.

Districts to Explore:

· Brera Design District: Known for a mix of modern and traditional designs.
· Isola Design District: Focuses on innovative and emerging design talents.
· Tortona Design Week: Offers immersive experiences and groundbreaking showcases.
· 5Vie Design Week: A blend of history and contemporary design.

Filarmonica della Scala 2024 Symphonic Season

The Filarmonica della Scala’s 2024 Symphonic Season in Milan is a prestigious series of concerts that showcases classical music performed by the renowned orchestra of La Scala.

The concerts will take place at the iconic Teatro alla Scala, one of the leading opera and ballet theaters in the world. This season includes performances conducted by Riccardo Chailly, with pieces by composers such as Arnold Schönberg, Anton Webern, and Alban Berg, scheduled for May 27, 29, and 30.

 

The FREE Concert for Milan

The Concerto per Milano (Concert for Milan) is a magnificent open-air classical music concert that takes place annually in the heart of Milan at the Piazza Duomo. This year, it is scheduled for June 8th at 21:30. The concert, performed by the esteemed Filarmonica della Scala, offers free admission to the public, attracting thousands of spectators to one of Italy’s most iconic landmarks. The program typically features a selection of beloved symphonies and arias from great Italian operas, and this year includes performances by the acclaimed Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Flórez.

What to do in Rome

A Guide to Events Happening in Spring in Milan, Rome, Florence, and Bologna 26

From left to right: the blooming of azaleas on the Spanish Steps, Parco degli Acquedotti, and cherry trees in Laghetto dell’Eur (Eur Pond Park).

Spring in Rome is a beautiful season to enjoy the outdoors and the blossoming of flowers. Here are some places we recommend visiting:

· The Spanish Steps (Piazza di Spagna): The blooming of azaleas on the Spanish Steps is a celebrated event, symbolizing the arrival of spring in Rome. Each year, the steps are adorned with vibrant azalea flowers, typically in full bloom from late April to early May, and they are displayed for about two weeks. The tradition dates back to the 18th century and creates a picturesque setting that attracts visitors from around the world.
· Parco degli Acquedotti: This park is a part of the Appia Antica Regional Park and is known for its ancient Roman aqueducts. In spring, the park is a lovely place to see wildflowers and the greenery surrounding the historic structures. It’s a perfect spot for a leisurely walk or a picnic amidst the ruins and natural beauty.
· Laghetto dell’Eur (Eur Pond Park): This park becomes especially beautiful between mid-March and mid-April, thanks to the cherry trees donated by Japan in 1957. It’s a perfect spot for a picnic or to embrace ‘Hanami’, the Japanese art of admiring cherry blossoms.
· Rome Botanical Gardens: A place where you can admire cherry blossoms and follow a symbolic walk through different phases of life, as per the Japanese art of landscaping.
· The gardens of the Japanese Institute in Rome: Another location to enjoy cherry blossoms and get a little taste of Japan in the Eternal City.

Romics 2024

Romics 2024, now in its XXXII edition, is a vibrant celebration of comics, animation, and games, set to take place from April 4th to April 7th at Fiera Roma. This festival offers the chance to meet your favorite artists, discover new games, and witness the creativity of cosplayers showcasing their costumes. More than just comics, Romics provides a comprehensive cultural experience that encompasses animation, cinema, and gaming.

The Italian Open

The Internazionali BNL d’Italia, also known as the Italian Open, is one of the most prestigious tennis tournaments on the ATP and WTA circuits. Held annually in Rome, it’s part of the ATP Masters 1000 and the WTA 1000 events, which are just a step below the Grand Slams in terms of ranking points and prestige.

The tournament takes place from May 6 to May 19 at the Foro Italico, a sports complex known for its monumental architecture and statues that celebrate the history of sport in Italy. It offers a chance to see some of the world’s best tennis players compete on clay courts, which require a unique style of play and strategy compared to other surfaces.

Codeway Expo 2024

The Codeway Expo 2024 is an international fair dedicated to the role of the private sector in the new scenarios of international development cooperation. Scheduled for May 15 to May 17, 2024 at Fiera Roma, this event is a unique platform designed to bring together key players from the world of international cooperation under one roof.

This year’s expo will shine a spotlight on:

· Exhibition: A showcase of the latest innovations and technologies.
· Conferences: Discussions and presentations on current trends and future directions in technology and development.
· Networking: Opportunities for professionals to connect and collaborate.
· Opportunities: A space for businesses to discover new avenues for growth and development.

 

What to do in Florence

A Guide to Events Happening in Spring in Milan, Rome, Florence, and Bologna 27

From left to right: the celebration of the Florentine New Year, Giardino delle Rose, and purple wisteria in bloom at Bardini Gardens.

Explore the blooming of flowers in Florence gardens:

· Giardino delle Rose: A quaint garden on the way to Piazzale Michelangelo, home to a wide variety of roses and offering a fantastic view of the city.
· Giardino dell’Orticoltura: Known for its rich colors and greenery, this horticultural garden is perfect for a sunny day picnic.
· Giardino di Boboli: Situated behind the Palazzo Pitti, it’s filled with greenery, sculptures, and fountains, ideal for a leisurely stroll.
· Bardini Gardens: Famous for its wisteria blooms in late April, creating a floral tunnel with panoramic views over the city.

The Florentine New Year

The Florentine New Year is a unique celebration that takes place in Florence, Italy, and it’s quite different from the January 1st New Year’s Day that most of the world celebrates. In 2024, this special day will be observed on March 25th. It’s a tradition that dates back to medieval times when the city of Florence used a different calendar system.

On this day, the city takes a step back in time with a historical parade that starts from the Palagio di Parte Guelfa, a significant building in Florence’s political history. People dressed in colorful medieval costumes march through the streets, leading up to the Basilica della Santissima Annunziata. The basilica is a beautiful church that’s closely tied to the celebration because March 25th is also the Feast of the Annunciation, marking the angel Gabriel’s announcement to the Virgin Mary.

For visitors, it’s a chance to experience Florence’s rich history firsthand. You’ll see flag-throwers, musicians, and various historical figures represented in the procession. It’s not just a walk through the city; it’s a walk through time, celebrating Florence’s heritage and the arrival of spring.

Florence Korea Film Fest

The Korea Film Festival in Florence is a cinematic celebration dedicated to Korean films, set to take place from March 21st to March 30th. This event showcases a diverse range of Korean cinema, including documentaries, short films, and feature-length movies, as well as retrospectives on prominent Korean directors. It’s a cultural highlight for film enthusiasts and those interested in Korean culture, offering not only film screenings but also masterclasses, art exhibitions, and creative workshops. The festival will be held at Cinema la Compagnia, and the program includes a concert on Saturday, March 30th, at Teatro Verdi. Additionally, there will be films that you can enjoy online.

Easter: Scoppio del Carro

The “Scoppio del Carro,” or “Explosion of the Cart,” is a traditional event that takes place on Easter Sunday at the Piazza del Duomo. This historical celebration dates back over 350 years and is rooted in the 11th century. The story goes that a young Florentine noble, Pazzino di Ranieri de’ Pazzi, participated in the First Crusade and was the first to raise the Christian banner in Jerusalem. For his bravery, he was awarded three flints from the Holy Sepulchre, which he brought back to Florence.

These flints were used to start a “new fire” during Easter, symbolizing Christ’s resurrection and new life. This fire was then distributed to the citizens of Florence to light their hearths and candles, which had been extinguished on Good Friday. Over time, the tradition evolved, and the holy fire was transported around the city by a cart. By the late 15th century, the cart was filled with explosive powder, and by the early 16th century, a mechanical dove was introduced to ignite the cart in a series of explosions.

Today, the event starts with a procession of people dressed in medieval costumes, including drummers and flag throwers, leading a flower-adorned cart pulled by white oxen through the streets of Florence to the Duomo. A mechanical dove, symbolizing the Holy Spirit, is then sent down a wire from the church to collide with the cart, setting off a spectacular display of fireworks. The successful ignition of the fireworks is seen as a sign of good luck for the coming year.

The Florence Flower Show

The Florence Flower Show, a market exhibition of rare and unusual plants, will take place on April 6-7 at the Corsini Gardens, located at Via della Scala 115. This spring event will feature the best national exhibitors, offering numerous visitors two days of fun and learning about the themes of nursery gardening and quality horticulture.

What to do in Bologna

A Guide to Events Happening in Spring in Milan, Rome, Florence, and Bologna 28

From left to right: Giardini Margherita, the Porticoes Festival photo by Giorgio Bianchi, and one the gardens visited during the activities of Di Verde in Verde.

The best places where you can witness the blooming of flowers and the lush greenery of the city are the following:

· Giardini Margherita: The largest public park in Bologna, perfect for a day out surrounded by nature.
· Orto Botanico ed Erbario: This botanical garden offers a peaceful retreat with a variety of plant species in full bloom1.
· Piazza Santo Stefano: Known for the beautiful flowering of wisteria.
· Via Pelagio Palagi and Via degli Orefici: These streets are famous for their Japanese cherry trees that blossom in spring.

Peonia in Bloom

Peonia in Bloom is a charming market exhibition which showcases high-quality craftsmanship from all over the country. Set at Via della Braina, 11, Peonia in Bloom offers a unique atmosphere where visitors can explore a selection of exquisite artisanal goods, including jewelry, clothing, illustrations, vintage items, home decor, and much more. Of course, the event wouldn’t be complete without its namesake peonies, the flowers that symbolize this annual gathering.

This year, Peonia in Bloom is scheduled to open to the public on the following dates:

· Friday, May 17: from 3:00 PM to 8:00 PM
· Saturday, May 18: from 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM
· Sunday, May 19: from 10:00 AM to 7:00 PM

Diverdeinverde

Di Verde in Verde is a charming event that showcases the city’s private gardens and green spaces. During this event, residents and visitors have the unique opportunity to explore these hidden gems, which are usually not open to the public. It’s a celebration of Bologna’s lush landscapes, offering a glimpse into the city’s horticultural heritage and the beauty of its private oases. This year, the event will follow the tradition of being held on the last weekend of May, from Saturday, May 25, to Sunday, May 26.

The Porticoes Festival

The Porticoes Festival is a vibrant celebration of the city’s iconic architectural feature, the porticoes, which are recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This festival is a cultural extravaganza that brings together art, music, and performances under the historic arches that line the streets of Bologna.

It will take place from June 13-25, 2024, at various locations across Bologna, including Piazza Maggiore, Santa Maria dei Servi, and the Treno della Barca.

The Formula 1 Grand Prix

The Formula 1 Grand Prix of Emilia-Romagna is a thrilling motor racing event that takes place at the Autodromo Internazionale Enzo e Dino Ferrari, commonly known as Imola. This historic track, once home to the San Marino GP, is located in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and is one of the few major international circuits to run in an anti-clockwise direction.

For the 2024 event, the Grand Prix is scheduled from May 17-19, with the main race occurring on Sunday, May 19. The weekend is packed with action, including practice sessions, qualifying rounds, and the main race, which spans 63 laps of the 4.909-kilometre track.

 

Circle the dates for a spring of cultural discovery, outdoor adventures, blooming beauty, and vibrant networking events, all featured in this guide.

 

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With its rich culture, welcoming people, breathtaking sceneries, and fantastic cuisine, Italy is truly a dream destination, isn’t it?

Whether you are considering moving to Italy for work or retirement, it is crucial to think about practical matters beforehand to enjoy the dolce vita later on. Understanding taxes is one of the first and most important practical steps you will need to take.

In this guide, we will break down how the Italian and the US tax systems work together, and how to file and pay your taxes in both countries to sidestep the pitfalls of double taxation.

Taxes for US expats in Italy: How to avoid double taxation? 29

Taxes in Italy: tax resident vs non-tax resident

If you qualify as an Italian tax resident, you’re subject to taxation on your domestic Italian income and your worldwide income. Non-residents are only taxed on income earned within Italy, such as from employment, business activities, real estate, and other sources within the country.

To be a tax resident in Italy you need to meet one of the following criteria:

· 183-day rule: Reside in Italy for more than 183 days within a calendar year.
· Primary residence: Have your economic and personal activities centered in Italy.
· Official residence: Be registered as a resident in the Italian Civil Registry.

While most residents and non-residents are required to file tax returns in Italy, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, individuals employed by a single employer who withholds income taxes from their paycheck are typically exempt from filing tax returns in Italy.

In case you have a dual residency, you’ll need to consult tax treaties to determine tax residency status and obligations. For example, the US-Italy tax treaty includes tie-breaker rules that prevent double taxation and determine which country holds primary rights over an individual’s income.

To make sure you are compliant with both Italian Agenzia delle Entrate regulations and IRS requirements, seek guidance from reliable experts like Taxes for Expats, a top-rated tax firm for US expatriates abroad.

Taxes for US expats living in Italy

Regardless of your tax compliance status in Italy, as a US expatriate or a resident alien, you must also file your US tax return. You might be exempt from filing if you fall below certain income thresholds or meet other exemption requirements.

US citizens residing overseas receive a default extension for filing taxes until June 15th. To extend it further, you can also file a tax extension form.

Note that an extension to file does not extend the deadline for paying taxes owed.

Italy has several tax treaties with the US designed to prevent double taxation on income and capital gains, including treaties on regular taxes, estate taxes, and a totalization agreement for social security.

However, the Italy-US tax treaty includes a savings clause, allowing the United States to tax its citizens based on its own tax laws, even if it conflicts with the treaty. This prioritization of domestic law means that certain benefits of the treaty may not apply to you as a US expatriate.

To lower the risk of double taxation, take advantage of tax breaks available to US expatriates.

Tax breaks for US expats in Italy

Two primary tax breaks for US expatriates residing abroad are the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (FEIE) and the Foreign Tax Credit (FTC).

Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (FEIE)

To qualify for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion (FEIE), individuals working in Italy must meet either the Physical Presence Test or the Bona Fide Residence Test:

· Physical Presence Test: This applies to US citizens who have spent at least 330 days outside of the United States within 12 months.

· Bona Fide Residence Test: Applicable to Americans who are recognized as official residents of another country and can prove this status.

For income earned in 2023, the maximum amount of foreign-earned income that can be excluded from US taxation under the FEIE is $120,000 per qualifying individual. It means that this income won’t be subject to US tax. If income exceeds this exclusion amount, you can use Italian tax credits to offset it. The FEIE does not apply to passive income sources such as pensions, dividends, or interests.

Taxpayers eligible for the FEIE can also deduct qualified housing-related expenses, such as rent and utilities, through the Foreign Housing Exclusion credit.

Note that taking the FEIE tax credit does not mean you are exempt from filing your US taxes. You still have to file your tax return and request an exemption from the IRS.

To claim the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, you must file Form 2555, Foreign Earned Income, along with your individual income tax return (Form 1040).

Foreign Tax Credit (FTC)

The Foreign Tax Credit can help you lower your US tax bill if you’ve already paid taxes in Italy.

This credit allows expats to offset US tax liabilities, provided that the taxes are legitimate, income-based, and attributed to the individual.

The FTC has certain limitations. For example, it cannot exceed the amount of US tax attributable to foreign-sourced income. Additionally, taxpayers cannot claim a credit for taxes paid to a foreign country if they also claim a deduction for the same taxes.

To apply for the Foreign Tax Credit, you’ll need to use Form 1116, which is attached to your US individual income tax return.

Retirement accounts and social security

Whether you are an American retiree or are considering Italy as your new work residence, it’s important to understand the tax implications of your retirement income.

Italy is one of 30 countries that the US has a Totalization Agreement with, meaning that managing retirement accounts and social security is much easier for US expats living in Italy.

Which country you pay social security taxes to depends on how long you will be living in Italy. If you plan to reside in Italy for up to five years, you typically continue paying your US social security taxes. If you reside in Italy for more than five years, you generally start paying Italian social security taxes.

The Totalization Agreement allows contributions made in either country to be counted towards your eligibility for social security benefits in both countries.

For example, if you lived in Italy for six years and paid Italian social security taxes during that time, those contributions would count towards your eligibility for US social security benefits when you retire. Similarly, if you had contributed to the US social security system during your working years in the US, those contributions could count towards your eligibility for Italian social security benefits if you later resided and worked in Italy.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal or tax advice. Always consult with a tax professional regarding your specific case.


Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
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Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
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Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
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Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services

Naples is a sunny city in the south of Italy, where travelers can enjoy its ancient history, lively culture, and delicious food. A perfect destination for a weekend getaway, Naples offers stunning views of Mount Vesuvius, UNESCO World Heritage sites, and the world-famous Neapolitan pizza. In this guide, we’ll explore how to reach Naples by train and create an itinerary for an unforgettable two-day visit.

How to Get There by Train

Navigating the Italian rail network to reach Naples is a seamless experience. Use platforms like Rome2Rio or Trainline to compare train options, prices, and frequencies. From major cities like Rome, Florence, or Milan, high-speed trains such as Frecciarossa provide a comfortable and scenic journey. Consider booking tickets in advance to secure the best deals. Upon arrival at Napoli Centrale or Napoli Piazza Garibaldi, easily access the city center via metro, bus, or taxi.

 

What to See and Do

Naples National Archaeological Museum

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 30

Begin your day at the Naples National Archaeological Museum, home to an impressive collection of artifacts from Pompeii and Herculaneum. Marvel at the well-preserved artifacts, including mosaics, frescoes, and sculptures, offering a glimpse into daily life during the Roman Empire.

Spaccanapoli

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 31

Take a stroll down Spaccanapoli, a narrow, bustling street that cuts through the heart of the historic center. Admire the charming architecture, visit traditional shops, and sample authentic Neapolitan pizza from one of the many pizzerias along the way. You can begin from Via Pasquale Scura in the Spanish Quarter and finish in Via Tupputi, or the other way around. The street is roughly 1.2 miles (2 km) long.

Naples Underground

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 32

Explore the hidden layers of Naples by visiting Napoli Sotterranea (Naples Underground). Descend into ancient aqueducts, tunnels, and catacombs, discovering the city’s fascinating subterranean history.

Piazza del Plebiscito

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 33

Begin at the heart of the city, Piazza del Plebiscito. Surrounded by landmarks like the Royal Palace, the Basilica of San Francesco di Paola, and the Teatro San Carlo, this grand square is the perfect introduction to Naples’ architectural splendors.

Royal Palace of Naples

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 34

Photo from palazzorealedinapoli.org

The Royal Palace of Naples is located in the heart of the city. Explore the opulent rooms, stroll through the beautiful gardens, and enjoy panoramic views of Naples from the palace grounds.

Napoli Cathedral and San Domenico Maggiore

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 35

Visit Napoli Cathedral, renowned for its Gothic facade and the Chapel of San Gennaro. Nearby, discover the artistic treasures of San Domenico Maggiore, featuring works by Caravaggio and frescoes by Giotto.

San Gregorio Armeno

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 36

Stroll through San Gregorio Armeno, known as the “Christmas Alley.” Immerse yourself in the festive atmosphere and explore shops offering handmade nativity scenes and figurines. You can find traditional characters, such as the Holy Family, the Three Kings, the shepherds, and the angels, as well as modern celebrities, politicians, sports stars, and even Elvis Presley. You can also see the typical Neapolitan scenes, such as the pizzeria, the fish market, the bakery, and the tavern. The figurines are made of terracotta, wood, papier-mâché, or resin, and are painted and dressed with great attention to detail.

Castel dell’Ovo

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 37

Take a leisurely walk to Castel dell’Ovo, a historic seaside fortress with panoramic views of the Gulf of Naples. The castle is the oldest castle in the city  and was built on the former island of Megaride, where the first Greek settlers of Naples founded their colony in the 6th century BC. The castle was later expanded and renovated by the Normans, the Angevins, and the Aragonese, who used it as a royal residence, a prison, and a treasury. The castle also witnessed some important historical events, such as the imprisonment of Empress Constance, the execution of King Conradin, and the miracle of the blood of Saint Januarius.

Palace of the Spaniard

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 38

The Palazzo dello Spagnolo is a magnificent example of Baroque architecture in Naples, located in the historic Rione Sanità district. The palace was built in 1738 by the architect Ferdinando Sanfelice for the Marquis of Poppano, Nicola Moscati. The most striking feature of the palace is its monumental staircase with double ramps, which was designed as a social space for the residents and visitors. The palace was later owned by a Spanish nobleman, Tommaso Atienza, who gave it its current name. The palace has a richly decorated interior with stucco and frescoes, some of which are still preserved. The palace also hosts a museum dedicated to the famous Neapolitan actor Totò, who was born in the same neighborhood

Naples Gastronomy

Naples is a city with a rich and diverse gastronomy, blending simple local ingredients with complex flavors. You can find many typical dishes and specialties that reflect the history, culture, and traditions of the city. Here are some places where you can eat the items included in your list:

Pizza Napoletana

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 39

There are many pizzerias in Naples that claim to make the best pizza Napoletana, but some of the most famous and authentic ones are L’Antica Pizzeria da Michele, Antonio & Antonio, and Sorbillo. These places use high-quality ingredients, such as San Marzano tomatoes, buffalo mozzarella, and extra virgin olive oil, and bake their pizzas in wood-fired ovens for a few minutes, resulting in a thin and soft crust with a slightly charred edge.

Frittura di paranza

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 40

Photo from napolitoday.it

This is a common street food that you can find in many places, especially near the port and the fish market. Some of the best places to eat frittura di paranza are Osteria Sannazaro, Gragnano E Pizza Di Lanzini Immacolata, and da Lia. These places offer fresh and crispy fried fish, served with salt and lemon juice, in a paper cone or a basket.

Spaghetti alle vongole

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 41

This is a classic pasta dish that showcases the freshness and flavor of the clams, which are abundant in the Gulf of Naples. Some of the best places to eat spaghetti alle vongole are Zi Teresa, ‘a Figlia d’’o Marenaro, Mimì alla Ferrovia. These places cook the pasta al dente and toss it with the clams, garlic, parsley, olive oil, and white wine, creating a light and aromatic sauce.

Pasta alla Genovese

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 42

This is a hearty and flavorful pasta dish that originated in Naples, despite its name that suggests a connection to Genoa. It is made with a slow-cooked onion sauce, beef, and cheese, and usually served with ziti or rigatoni. Some of the best places to eat pasta alla Genovese are Trattoria da Nennella, Antonio & Antonio, and Tandem Ragù Ristorante Napoli. These places prepare the sauce with high-quality meat and onions, and simmer it for hours, until it becomes thick and rich.

Pasta fresca con scampi

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 43

Photo from buonissimo.it

This is a delicate and elegant pasta dish that is made with fresh handmade pasta, scampi (large shrimp), cherry tomatoes, and basil. It is a dish that requires skill and quality ingredients, and some of the best places to eat it are Umberto, Antica Capri, and Trattoria Pizzeria Spaccanapoli. These places make their own pasta from scratch, and use fresh and juicy scampi and tomatoes, and fragrant basil, to create a delicious and colorful dish.

Neapolitan ragu

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 44

This is a rich and savory meat sauce that is made with beef, pork, tomato, onion, carrot, celery, wine, and herbs, and simmered for hours. It is usually served with pasta, such as ziti or rigatoni, or with polenta or bread. Some of the best places to eat Neapolitan ragu are Tandem Ragù Ristorante Napoli and Osteria da Carmela. These places use tender and flavorful cuts of meat, such as locena (beef chuck) and ribs, and cook them slowly with the tomato and vegetables, until the sauce becomes thick and aromatic.

Cuoppo

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 45

Photo from napolitoday.it

This is a cone-shaped paper bag filled with assorted fried snacks, such as croquettes, arancini, mozzarella, zucchini, and seafood. It is a typical street food that you can find in friggitorie (fry shops), and it is perfect for eating while strolling through the streets of the center. Some of the best places to eat cuoppo are Via San Biagio Dei Librai and La Passione di Sofi. These places offer a variety of fried treats, made with fresh and quality ingredients, and served hot and crispy in a paper cone.

Sfogliatella

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 46

This is a crispy and flaky pastry, filled with ricotta cheese, candied citrus, and cinnamon. There are two types: riccia (curly) and frolla (smooth). It is a typical dessert that you can find in pasticcerie (pastry shops), and it is best eaten warm and fresh. Some of the best places to eat sfogliatella are Antico Forno delle Sfogliatelle Calde Fratelli Attanasio, La Sfogliatella Mary, and Pescheria Mattiucci. These places make their own pastry dough and filling, and bake their sfogliatelle daily, creating a crunchy and creamy treat.

Baba al rhum

A Weekend Guide to Naples’ Culinary and Cultural Highlights 47
This is a soft and spongy cake, soaked in rum and sugar syrup, and sometimes filled with whipped cream or pastry cream. It is a typical dessert that you can find in pasticcerie (pastry shops), and it is often eaten as a snack or a breakfast. Some of the best places to eat baba al rhum are Al Capriccio, Bar Capparelli, and Sfogliatelle Attanasio. These places offer moist and fluffy baba, soaked in aromatic rum syrup, and filled with smooth and sweet cream.

 

Naples is a city of sunshine, history, and culture. As you spend a weekend there, you will be enchanted by its old-world charm, vibrant atmosphere, and delicious food. Naples is a treasure of southern Italy, nestled by the blue sea and the majestic Mount Vesuvius. It invites you to explore its stunning sights, from UNESCO World Heritage sites to the famous Neapolitan pizza.

 

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Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

Italy offers amazing landscapes, from mountains, to forests, to lakes and abundant wilderness. It’s only logical that many dream about free camping, just like you would do in Canada, the US, or Northern Europe. Grab your tent, car, all the important things you need to survive, and off you go.

Not so fast!

There is no National Law regulating free camping in Italy. Which is sort of a problem.

Defining Camping and Bivouacking

Sleeping under the stars is something many dream of in Italy (no pun intended), but it comes with its set of obstacles.

Camping, or rather bivouacking (basically temporary setting up a tent), is permissible in some places, when your stay in one place is limited to nighttime hours only (so you have to set up the tend after sunset, and remove everything before sunrise).

So all good? Unfortunately not.

The problem is, again, that there is a lack of a National Law. So in some places bivouacking is tolerated, but not explicitely allowed, nor forbidden.

So how do you avoid hefty fines?

Let’s take a look at your options.

The first course of action should be to check whether the area you’re planning to free camp in is inside a National, or Regional Park. You can either use the Park Locator, which conveniently shows you all National and Regional Parks in an interactive map, or the parks.it website.

Exploring the Wild Side: Camping Regulations in Italy 48

The advantage of the Park Locator website is that clicking on any of the parks, you are presented with a detail card with additional information about that park (and also a downloadable, free map, if available).

If there are publicly available park regulations, you can find them here. Some parks allow free camping, but want to know where exactly you’ll be staying, and for how long.

Some parks only allow camping in specific designated areas, and generally the wilder, integrally protected areas (Zone A) are always off-limits.

Additionally, you’ll find links to their official website and email contacts, providing you with the opportunity to obtain more information directly from the park authorities.

Exploring the Wild Side: Camping Regulations in Italy 49

To avoid hefty fines, it’s imperative to adhere strictly to these guidelines.

What to do if you want to free camp outside of a Regional or National Park?

In this case, you will need to check the rules of the local authorities, typically on the website of the Comune (municipality).

Where is it strictly forbidden to free camp/bivouac?

In Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia, and Sardegna, it’s essential to adhere to local regulations regarding camping. In Trentino Alto-Adige, camping near tourist accommodations is strictly forbidden.

Where can I apply the “free bivouacking” rule?

In Valle d’Aosta, camping is permitted only above 2500m altitude. In Lombardy, Tuscany, and Liguria, there are no clear regulations, so it’s necessary to check with local authorities depending on your camping location.

In Piemonte and Marche, camping is restricted to 48-hour stays in specific locations, with prior notification required to the mayor’s office. Rules vary across regions, highlighting the importance of thorough research and adherence to local guidelines.

While free camping is not impossible, it is often easier simply contacting a campground and renting a designated space, than navigating through municipal regulations.

If you are not someone to give up easily, certainly National and Regional Parks are a good starting point, and getting in touch with the park authorities might point you into the right direction.

As always, stay safe, stay fit, and hike a bit!
Sal

 


 

Exploring the Wild Side: Camping Regulations in Italy 50

 

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Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
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FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

 

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Women’s Day, or La Festa della Donna, is a popular and meaningful occasion in Italy. It is celebrated every year on March 8 to honor the achievements and struggles of women in society. Here are some ways to join the festivities and show your appreciation for the women in your life in 2024.

How to Celebrate Women’s Day in Italy in 2024 51Give or receive a mimosa flower

The mimosa flower is the symbol of Women’s Day in Italy. It is a bright yellow and fragrant blossom that represents strength, sensitivity, and femininity. On March 8, you will see many vendors selling mimosas on the streets, and many women wearing them on their lapels. It is a tradition to give or receive a mimosa flower as a sign of respect and solidarity. You can also find mimosa-themed cakes, cocktails, and desserts in many cafes and restaurants.

Visit a museum for free or at a discounted price

Another way to celebrate Women’s Day in Italy is to visit a museum for free or at a discounted price. The Italian Culture and Tourism Ministry (MiBACT) offers free entry to all state-owned museums on March 8, as well as some special exhibitions and events dedicated to women’s art and history. You can also participate in the social media campaign #8marzoalmuseo by taking and sharing photos of the women who appear in various artworks. Some of the museums that participate in this initiative are the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, the Colosseum in Rome, and the Pinacoteca di Brera in Milan.

Some Museums, archaeological parks, monumental complexes, castles, historic villas and gardens, and other state cultural places that will offer free admission on March 8 include:

 

Rome

· Parco archeologico di Cerveteri e Tarquinia – Museo nazionale archeologico cerite (Archaeological Park of Cerveteri and Tarquinia – National Archaeological Museum of Cerveteri)
· Museo archeologico dell’Abbazia greca di San Nilo (Archaeological Museum of the Greek Abbey of San Nilo)
· Museo nazionale etrusco di Villa Giulia (National Etruscan Museum of Villa Giulia)
· Museo delle Civiltà (Museum of Civilizations)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Villa dei Quintili e Santa Maria Nova (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Villa dei Quintili and Santa Maria Nova)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Mausoleo di Cecilia Metella e Chiesa di San Nicola (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Mausoleum of Cecilia Metella and Church of San Nicola)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Villa di Capo di Bove (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Villa of Capo di Bove)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Parco delle Tombe della via Latina e Basilica di Santo Stefano (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Park of the Tombs of the Via Latina and Basilica of Santo Stefano)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Villa di Sette Bassi (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Villa of Sette Bassi)
· Parco archeologico dell’Appia antica – Antiquarium di Lucrezia Romana (Archaeological Park of the Appian Way – Antiquarium of Lucrezia Romana)
· Terme di Caracalla (Baths of Caracalla)
· Galleria nazionale d’arte moderna e contemporanea (National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art)
· Museo Boncompagni Ludovisi per le arti decorative, il costume e la moda dei secoli XIX e XX (Boncompagni Ludovisi Museum for Decorative Arts, Costume, and Fashion of the 19th and 20th Centuries)
· Museo nazionale romano – Palazzo Altemps (National Roman Museum – Palazzo Altemps)
· Drugstore Museum e Circuito Necropoli Portuense (Drugstore Museum and Necropolis Portuense Circuit)
· Museo nazionale degli strumenti musicali (National Museum of Musical Instruments)
· Museo Hendrik Christian Andersen (Hendrik Christian Andersen Museum)
· Galleria Spada (Spada Gallery)
· Istituto autonomo Vittoriano e Palazzo Venezia – Museo nazionale del Palazzo di Venezia (Vittoriano Autonomous Institute and Palazzo Venezia – National Museum of Palazzo di Venezia)
· Pantheon
· Villa Adriana e Villa d’Este  (Villa Adriana and Villa d’Este)

 

Milan

· Pinacoteca di Brera (Brera Art Gallery)

 

Florence

· Galleria dell’Accademia di Firenze (Gallery of the Academy of Florence)
· Museo di San Marco (Museum of San Marco)
· Musei del Bargello – Museo nazionale del Bargello (Bargello Museums – National Bargello Museum)
· Gallerie degli Uffizi – Galleria d’arte moderna (Palazzo Pitti) (Uffizi Galleries – Gallery of Modern Art, Palazzo Pitti)
· Gallerie degli Uffizi – Palazzo Pitti (Uffizi Galleries – Palazzo Pitti)
· Musei del Bargello – Chiesa e Museo di Orsanmichele (Bargello Museums – Church and Museum of Orsanmichele)
· Museo archeologico nazionale di Firenze (National Archaeological Museum of Florence)
· Musei del Bargello – Museo della Casa Fiorentina Antica, Palazzo Davanzati (Bargello Museums – Museum of the Ancient Florentine House, Palazzo Davanzati)
· Musei del Bargello – Cappelle Medicee (Bargello Museums – Medici Chapels)
· Gallerie degli Uffizi  (Uffizi Galleries)

 

Bologna

· Pinacoteca nazionale di Bologna (National Gallery of Bologna)

 

Venice

· Museo di Palazzo Grimani (Museum of Palazzo Grimani)
· Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia (Galleries of the Academy of Venice)
· Biblioteca nazionale Marciana – Sale monumentali e Ridotti dei Procuratori (National Library Marciana – Monumental Rooms and Procurators’ Lodges)
· Museo d’Arte Orientale Venezia (Museum of Oriental Art Venice)
· Galleria Giorgio Franchetti alla Ca’ d’Oro (Giorgio Franchetti Gallery at Ca’ d’Oro)

 

Verona

· Museo archeologico nazionale di Verona (National Archaeological Museum of Verona)

For more information on events by region, click here.

 

Enjoy a night out with your friends

Women’s Day in Italy is also an occasion to have fun and enjoy a night out with your friends. Many bars, clubs, and cinemas offer discounts, free drinks, or gifts to women on March 8. You can also find live music, comedy shows, and theater performances that celebrate women’s talent and humor. Some of the popular venues that host Women’s Day events are the Teatro dell’Opera in Rome, the Teatro alla Scala in Milan, and the Teatro Verdi in Florence.

Support a cause or a charity

Finally, you can celebrate Women’s Day in Italy by supporting a cause or a charity that works for women’s rights and empowerment. You can donate money, volunteer your time, or raise awareness about the issues that affect women in Italy and around the world. Some of the organizations that you can support are the UDI (Unione Donne Italiane), which is the oldest and largest women’s association in Italy, the D.i.Re (Donne in Rete contro la Violenza), which is a network of shelters and centers for women victims of violence, and the WFP (World Food Programme), which is the UN agency that fights hunger and malnutrition among women and girls.

A Guide to Italian Easter in 2024


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

A SIMPLE GUIDE FOR AN EASY TRANSACTION

The mortgage loan for foreigners interested in buying a property in Italy is a medium- to long-term commitment, typically lasting from 5 to 25 years. The customer typically receives the entire sum in one lump sum and repays it over time in installments of constant or variable amounts. This type of loan is commonly used to buy, build, or renovate properties, especially houses. The term ‘mortgage’ is used because the payment of installments is secured by a mortgage on the property. Financial institutions, including banks and other intermediaries, can grant mortgages. Some banks even provide tailor-made mortgage options for foreigners residing and working in Italy. The loan amount varies based on the applicant’s economic needs and repayment capabilities. It’s important to note that mortgages for foreigners can only be requested if the property is located within Italian territory. We can collaborate to find the best solutions for you, optimizing your chances of obtaining a mortgage in Italy for buying or renovating a property.

HOW DO I CHOOSE A MORTGAGE?

Can I get a mortgage in Italy?
Obtaining a mortgage for foreigners is not as challenging as one might think, but it’s not entirely straightforward either. Similar to Italians, foreigners must provide guarantees of solvency and meet specific income requirements. The process is generally the same, with a few minor differences. Possession of residence in Italy is often valued by most banks, considering it an additional guarantee to income and personal guarantees.

How much can I ask?
In general, the intermediary grants an amount not exceeding 60% of the property’s value, determined based on an expert opinion. Some intermediaries may go beyond 60%, but this often requires more collateral and less favorable conditions. There is no maximum figure for applying for a mortgage; it depends on the intermediary’s policies. Beyond EUR 2 million, considering other financing solutions is advisable, and our company can assist and advise on alternative solutions.

What installment can I afford?
Before applying for a mortgage, it is advisable to carefully assess your income, especially in perspective, and determine your monthly availability after deducting ordinary expenses. The installment should not exceed one-third of your disposable income to cover current expenses, unforeseen costs, and potential income reductions due to illness, accidents, or redundancy.

How much does the mortgage cost me?
The primary cost is interest, which is the remuneration for the granted loan and depends on the mortgage duration. Additional costs, detailed in the Information Sheet available from the intermediary and its website, should be considered. When planning expenses, account for notary fees and taxes payable once the home purchase contract is concluded.

What duration suits me?
The loan duration, agreed upon between the customer and the broker, is a crucial element determining the installment amount. The installment comprises both capital and interest. With the same loan amount and interest rate, shorter durations result in higher installments but lower interest, while longer durations yield higher interest but lower installments.

Who can be financed?
Individuals and companies residing almost anywhere globally can be financed.

Which customers with foreign currencies can be financed?
Commonly financed currencies include EUR, GBP, USD, CAD, AUD, SGD, HKD, DKK, NOK, SEK, CHF, JPY; other currencies can also be estimated.

What can be financed?
Financing is possible for purchasing a first home, holiday home, and income-generating real estate with all necessary permits. Property renovations can also be financed, up to a maximum of 50% of the final property value.

Up to what age can I apply for a mortgage and for how many years?
The mortgage must be completed by the age of 75 for the applicant, and the maximum duration is 25 years.

How many types of mortgage amortization are there?
There are four main amortization plans: French, German, Italian, and American (Anglo-Saxon). The most widely used in Italy is the French plan, where installments remain constant, each comprising a different share of capital and interest.

TYPES OF MORTGAGE IN ITALY

Fixed-rate mortgage
The interest rate remains the one fixed by the contract for the entire duration of the mortgage. The disadvantage is not being able to take advantage of any reductions in market rates that may occur over time. The fixed rate is recommended for those who fear that market rates may rise and from the moment the contract is signed want to be certain of the amounts of the individual instalments and the total amount of the debt to be repaid. In return for this advantage, the intermediary often applies more onerous conditions than for a variable rate mortgage.

Variable-rate mortgage
The interest rate can vary at fixed intervals from the starting rate by following the fluctuations of a reference parameter, usually a market or monetary policy rate. The main risk is an unsustainable increase in the amount of the instalments. For the same duration, variable rates are initially lower than fixed rates, but can increase over time, thus causing the amount of the instalments to rise, even substantially. The variable rate is recommended for those who want a rate that is always in line with market trends, or who can bear any increase in the amount of instalments.

Mixed-rate mortgage
The interest rate can change from fixed to variable (or vice versa) at fixed intervals and/or under certain conditions specified in the contract. Advantages and disadvantages are alternately those of the fixed or variable rate.

Two-rate mortgage
The mortgage is divided into two parts: one with the fixed rate, one with the variable rate. The dual rate is recommended for those who prefer an intermediate solution between the fixed and variable rate, balancing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Soft-rate mortgage
In some cases public authorities may contribute to the payment of interest on a mortgage.

HOW MUCH DOES A MORTGAGE COST?

Taxes and tax benefits
Taxes and tax benefits If the mortgage is granted by a bank, the customer pays a tax of 2% of the total amount, or 0.25% in the case of a ‘first home’ purchase. The tax is withheld directly by the bank, so the amount the customer receives is less than the amount granted. If the loan is granted by a non-banking company, e.g. a finance company, the conditions are less favourable. There may also be other taxes related to the registration of the mortgage or other obligations. The interest paid on a mortgage loan for the purchase, construction or renovation of the main dwelling is deductible from Personal Income Tax. The amount and conditions for the deduction are set by law.

Other costs
In addition to interest and taxes, consider:

• The fee of the financial advisor who will take care of the entire bureaucratic process and assist you from start to finish.  Our cost varies from 3% to 5% of the sum disbursed by the intermediary with a minimum of 2,500.00 euros
• The intermediary’s fee for the investigation costs, which may consist of either a fixed amount or a percentage calculated on the amount of the loan
• The appraisal fees, which may be charged for the valuation of the property to be mortgaged
• The notary fees for the mortgage contract and the registration of the mortgage in the land registers
• The cost of the insurance premium to cover damage to the property and possibly risks related to events in the client’s life that could prevent him from repaying the loan

If the intermediary asks to take out life insurance, they must submit at least two quotes from two different insurance companies to the client.

It is important to pay attention to the cost of the policy: the one proposed by the intermediary may be more expensive than others offered on the market. If one decides on a policy other than those offered by the intermediary, the latter cannot change the conditions of its mortgage offer. Interest on arrears, if you pay the instalment late, generally entails a surcharge of between 1% and 4% over the rate agreed for the loan and runs from the day of the due date until the instalment is paid. The annual file management fee, instalment collection fees, costs for sending communications (the full list of costs is in the Information Sheet).

AMORTIZATION PLAN

The amortization schedule is the debt repayment plan. It is important, for mortgages that are or may remain at a fixed rate for the duration of the contract, to ask the intermediary to examine it. The plan establishes the amount, the date by which all the debt must be paid, the frequency of the individual instalments (month, quarter, half-year), the criteria for determining the amount of each instalment, and the remaining debt. The instalment consists of two elements: Capital portion, i.e. the amount of the outstanding loan Interest portion, i.e. the interest accrued. There are different loan repayment mechanisms. In Italy, the most common repayment plan is the so-called ‘French’ method: the instalment is composed of an increasing principal portion and a decreasing interest portion. In the beginning, mainly interest is paid; as the capital is repaid, the amount of interest decreases and the capital share increases. The change in the composition of the instalment in principal and interest share can affect tax deductions, the amount of which can therefore change from year to year. In particular, the deductible portion is the interest portion, which decreases over time.

HOW TO DECIDE WHICH MORTGAGE TO CHOOSE?

Compare offers from several intermediaries
The rates and conditions offered by different intermediaries can vary, even by a lot. Today, almost all intermediaries have a website on which they publish the Comparison Sheet and the Information Sheet for each mortgage: it is therefore possible to compare the offers with all the necessary calm. There are also search engines on the internet that offer guides and suggest the most suitable mortgages for everyone’s needs. Of course, it is always possible to request the information documents directly from the intermediary. An important element to assess and compare is the APR (Annual Percentage Rate), which all intermediaries are required by law to publish on their information sheets. The APR is a summary of the overall cost of the loan, which includes the interest rate (and therefore also the spread applied by the intermediary) and the other expense items (e.g. application and instalment collection costs).

Select intermediaries for customized proposals

The information documents indicate the conditions according to a standard scheme. Depending on one’s personal situation, the customer may obtain more favourable conditions. When examining proposals, pay close attention to:

• Spread

• APR (in Italian TAEG)

• Amortisation plan

• All items of expenditure

• Time for granting (must be compatible with the time needed to purchase the property)

• Tax savings, which may vary depending on the composition of the instalments (principal and interest share) set out in the repayment plan.

 

 

WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE SIGNING A MORTGAGE

Provide information and documents for the preliminary investigation

With the appraisal, the intermediary verifies the customer’s income, assets and collateral to assess his repayment capacity over time. Each intermediary has its own procedures, but in general the documents to be submitted concern:

Presenting guarantees

The first guarantee that the broker requires is the mortgage, which gives him the right to have the property sold if the client fails to repay the loan. To determine the value of the property, and thus of the collateral, the property is first subjected to an appraisal. The client may live in the mortgaged property and may rent it out. Selling it, on the other hand, may be more complicated precisely because of the lien on it. The lender may require other collateral in addition to the mortgage, for example when the client has a low income compared to the instalments, does not have a stable job or is applying for a mortgage for more than 80% of the value of the property. Among the most common guarantees is the surety bond, issued by a party other than the customer applying for the mortgage. With the surety, the guarantor is liable for the repayment of the entire loan with all his assets.

The main steps:

• Application and submission of documents

• Assessment of income

• Technical expertise and notary’s report

• Final decision on granting of financing

• Signing of contract

• Disbursement of the loan

A MAJOR FINANCIAL COMMITMENT

Do not get into debt beyond your means
A mortgage is a major financial commitment to be borne over time, both for an individual and for a family. Already at the time of application, it is essential to assess whether one’s income is sufficient to pay the instalments. During the mortgage period, unforeseen events may occur that require new outgoings (medical, household, children’s expenses) or reduce income (loss of job, redundancy, illness). Before any application for a mortgage or loan, you should always consider whether you are not getting into too much debt.

Pay installments on time

If you do not pay your instalments on time, the intermediary charges interest on arrears, which is added to the amount owed. In the most serious cases, the intermediary can terminate the contract. If the intermediary is a bank, the bank may dissolve the contract for:

• Non-payment of even one instalment
• Delay of more than 180 days from the due date in paying even a single instalment
• Delay (between 30 and 180 days from the due date) in the payment of instalments more than seven times

If the bank terminates the contract, the customer must repay the outstanding debt immediately. If they cannot repay the debt, the intermediary may have the mortgaged property attached and sold at auction. If there is a guarantor, they too are obliged to repay what is owed. The intermediary may also report the untrustworthy customer to the Central Risks Bureau, a report that jeopardises the possibility of obtaining financing in the future.

If the instalment over time proves to be too high, the customer should seek a solution with the intermediary immediately

If the customer cannot always pay their mortgage instalments on time, it is advisable for them to contact the intermediary promptly to seek a solution together. Firstly, it is possible to renegotiate, for example, the type of rate, spread and duration, without the notary’s intervention because the original mortgage remains valid.

Another possibility is the temporary suspension of payments, to overcome the moment of difficulty.

Alternatively, it is possible at any time to transfer the loan to another intermediary, without any charge or penalty. This is known as portability, which allows the mortgage to be repaid using the same sum granted by a new intermediary and keeping the original mortgage. The sum will be repaid on the terms agreed with the new intermediary. The customer has no right to obtain a new loan. However, if this is granted to them, the old intermediary cannot prevent or hinder the transfer of the mortgage. The customer does not have to bear any costs, not even indirect costs (e.g. commissions, fees, charges or penalties), either for the termination of the loan with the old intermediary or for the granting of the new loan.

For further information, contact us at legal@expatslivinginrome.com 

 

Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Property Search and Visits

Do you dream of investing in real estate and owning a property in Italy? We can guide you through the entire process of finding and buying your ideal property.

We offer a range of services to help you achieve that, such as:

1. A 30 Minutes Free Call
2. A 30/60 Minutes Video Call
3. Property Search on behalf of the Customer
4. Real estate visits on behalf of the client or in accompaniment
5. Purchase Proposal / Deed of Purchase

In a 30 Minute Free Call, we can better understand your target, area, budget, parameters, etc. In a 30/60 minutes Video Call, we can determine the perfect profile of the house to search for. Regarding the search of the property on behalf of the customer, we’ll send a curated selection of properties with descriptions and details that match your filters and parameters. We will agree together on the properties to visit, either on behalf of the customer (Photo, Video & Video Call) or together with the customer.

When we find the perfect property, we can proceed with the Purchase Proposal, helping you negotiate.

Purchase Proposal

Upon the acceptance of your offer by the sellers, your journey towards property ownership in Italy continues with our assistance through the subsequent stages to close the purchase:

1. Collecting all property documents from the seller
2. Analyzing the documents collected (Permits / Licenses / Etc.)
3. Choosing a Notary with a relative quote (Taxes / Fees)
4. Choosing an Interpreter or a Notary Procurement
5. Opening an Italian bank account if possible
6. Using the notary’s dedicated bank account to pay all parties (Sellers / Real Estate/ Taxes/ Notary Fees)
7. Booking an appointment for closing (Deed of Purchase)

Buying a property in Italy can be a complex and daunting process, especially for foreigners who are not familiar with the legal and bureaucratic aspects. That’s why we are here to help you every step of the way, from finding the property to signing the deed of purchase. We have the experience, the network, and the passion to make your real estate investment in Italy a smooth and successful one. Don’t hesitate to contact us today and let us know how we can assist you.

 

 

 

Read more about: 

Buying Property – Mortgage Guidelines for Foreigners


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Florence is one of the most beautiful and culturally rich cities in Italy, and a perfect destination for a weekend getaway. Whether you are interested in art, history, architecture, or cuisine, Florence has something to offer for everyone. In this article, we will give you some tips on how to plan your weekend in Florence, and how to get there by train from any other city in Italy.

How to get to Florence by train

Traveling by train is a convenient and comfortable way to reach Florence from any other city in Italy. You can choose between high-speed trains (Frecciarossa, Frecciargento, or Italo) that connect Florence with major cities such as Rome, Milan, Venice, Naples, and Turin in less than two hours, or regional trains (Regionale or Intercity) that offer more frequent and cheaper services, but take longer and may require changes. You can check the timetables and prices, and buy your tickets online on the websites of Trenitalia or Italo, or at the station. You can also use the ItaliaRail website, which offers the same fares as Trenitalia, but in English and with more payment options.

The main train station in Florence is Santa Maria Novella (SMN), located in the city center, within walking distance from the main attractions. Some trains may also stop at Campo di Marte or Rifredi, which are less central, but well connected by bus or tram.

How to spend your weekend in Florence

Florence is a relatively small city, but it is packed with things to see and do. You can easily explore it on foot, or use the public transport system (bus or tram) if you prefer. Here are some suggestions on how to make the most of your weekend in Florence, depending on your interests and preferences.

 

A Weekend in Florence: How to Get There and What to Do 52

From left to right: The Birth of Venus by Botticelli at the Uffizi Gallery and David by Michelangelo at the Galleria dell’Accademia.

 

If you love art and history, you will be amazed by the wealth and variety of museums and monuments in Florence. You can start with the Uffizi Gallery, one of the most famous and visited art museums in the world, where you can admire masterpieces by Botticelli, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, and many others. You can also visit the Accademia Gallery, where you can see the original statue of David by Michelangelo, as well as other sculptures and paintings. Another must-see is the Duomo, the iconic cathedral of Florence, with its impressive dome by Brunelleschi, the baptistery, and the bell tower. You can climb to the top of the dome or the tower for a stunning view of the city. You can also explore the Palazzo Vecchio, the former residence and seat of power of the Medici family, and the Bargello Museum, which houses a remarkable collection of Renaissance sculptures.

 

A Weekend in Florence: How to Get There and What to Do 53

From left to right: the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore and Piazzale Michelangelo.

 

If you are looking for a romantic and relaxing weekend, you can enjoy the charm and beauty of Florence without following a strict itinerary. You can stroll along the Arno river, crossing the famous Ponte Vecchio, the oldest and most picturesque bridge in Florence, lined with jewelry shops. You can also visit the Boboli Gardens, a vast and elegant park behind the Pitti Palace, where you can admire fountains, statues, and panoramic views. You can also take a short bus ride to Piazzale Michelangelo, a terrace overlooking the city, where you can watch the sunset and take some amazing photos. For a special treat, you can book a table at one of the many restaurants that offer a romantic dinner with a view, such as La Loggia, La Terrazza, or B-Roof.

If you are traveling with your family and kids, you can find many fun and educational activities in Florence. You can visit the Galileo Museum, where you can learn about the life and discoveries of the famous scientist, and see his original instruments and experiments. You can also visit the Leonardo da Vinci Museum, where you can interact with models and machines inspired by the genius inventor and artist. You can also take a break from the city and visit the nearby Fiesole, a charming hilltop town with Roman ruins, a medieval cathedral, and a panoramic view. You can also enjoy some gelato at one of the many ice cream parlors in Florence, such as Vivoli, Carabè, or Gelateria dei Neri.

Whatever your style and budget, you can find a wide range of accommodation options in Florence, from luxury hotels to cozy bed and breakfasts, from apartments to hostels. You can use websites such as Booking.com, Airbnb, or Hostelworld to find and compare the best deals for your weekend in Florence.

We hope this article has given you some ideas and inspiration for your weekend in Florence. Florence is a city that will enchant you with its beauty, culture, and atmosphere, and make you want to come back again and again. Buon viaggio!

 

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The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums

A Guide to Living in Italy with a Dog

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

 

Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services

Moving to a new country can be an exciting and rewarding experience, but it can also bring some challenges and difficulties. When you move you may face different customs, languages, values, and expectations that can make you feel confused, frustrated, or isolated. You may also miss your family, friends, and familiar surroundings that you left behind. These feelings are normal and common, and they are part of what is known as culture shock and homesickness.

Culture shock is the psychological and emotional reaction to living in a new and unfamiliar culture. It can affect anyone, regardless of their age, background, or previous travel experience. Culture shock can manifest in different ways, such as:

– Feeling anxious, irritable, or depressed
– Having difficulty sleeping or eating
– Feeling bored, lonely, or alienated
– Having trouble communicating or making friends
– Feeling insecure or inadequate
– Experiencing physical symptoms such as headaches, stomach aches, or fatigue.

Homesickness is the longing for the familiar and comfortable aspects of your home country. It can be triggered by various factors, such as missing your loved ones and social support; favourite foods, hobbies, or activities; sense of identity and belonging; routine and structure; cultural norms and values.

Both culture shock and homesickness are natural and temporary responses to a major life change. They do not mean that you are weak or that you made a wrong decision. They are part of the process of adapting to a new environment and learning to appreciate its diversity and richness. However, if left unaddressed, they can affect your well-being, performance, and satisfaction. Therefore, it is important to find healthy and effective ways to cope with them and to make the most of your experience abroad.

Here are some tips and resources that can help you deal with culture shock and homesickness:

Prepare yourself before you go

Do some research on the country and culture that you are moving to. Italy has a rich and diverse culture influenced by the Roman Empire and the Renaissance1. Learn about its history, geography, politics, economy, religion, art, and cuisine. Try to learn some basic words and phrases in the local language, which is Italian for most of the population, but there are also many dialects and minority languages spoken in different regions. Find out about the practical aspects of living there, such as the climate, which varies from the Mediterranean in the south to the Alpine in the north, transportation, which includes trains, buses, taxis, and cars, health care, which is universal and public, but also has private options, education, which is compulsory and free until age 16, and legal system, which is based on civil law and has a parliamentary republic as the form of government.

Keep an open mind and a positive attitude

Be curious and respectful of the differences that you encounter. Italy has a diverse and complex society, with many regional and local identities, traditions, and customs. Try to see them as opportunities to learn and grow, rather than as threats or obstacles. Avoid making judgments or comparisons based on your own culture. Instead, try to understand the reasons and meanings behind the behaviours and values of the people that you meet. For example, Italians are generally warm, friendly, and expressive, but they also value privacy, respect, and etiquette. They may greet you with a kiss on both cheeks, but they may also expect you to dress appropriately, use formal titles, and follow certain rules of dining and conversation.

Immerse yourself in the local culture

Try to get involved in the local community and activities. Join a club, a class, a volunteer project, or a social group that interests you. There are many opportunities to meet new people and learn new skills in Italy, such as sports, arts, languages, cooking, and gardening. Visit the local museums, galleries, parks, and monuments. Italy has a rich and varied cultural heritage, with many UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as the Colosseum, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, the Vatican City, and the Venice Lagoon. Attend the local festivals, events, and celebrations. Italy has a lively and colorful calendar of festivities, such as Carnival, Easter, Christmas, and many regional and local holidays, such as the Palio of Siena, the Feast of San Gennaro, and the Festa della Repubblica. Taste the local food and drinks. Italy is famous for its cuisine, which is based on fresh, seasonal, and local ingredients, such as pasta, pizza, cheese, wine, and coffee. Each region and city has its own specialties and recipes, such as lasagna, risotto, tiramisu, and gelato. Listen to the local music and watch the local shows. Italy has a rich and diverse musical tradition, from opera to folk to pop. Some of the most famous Italian musicians and composers are Luciano Pavarotti, Andrea Bocelli, Ennio Morricone, and Laura Pausini. Italy also has a vibrant and influential cinema industry, with directors such as Federico Fellini, Roberto Rossellini, Sergio Leone, and Paolo Sorrentino. Learn about the local history and traditions. Italy has a long and fascinating history, from the ancient Romans to the modern republic. You can learn about the historical figures, events, and movements that shaped the country and the world, such as Julius Caesar, Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo Galilei, Giuseppe Garibaldi, Benito Mussolini, and Silvio Berlusconi. You can also learn about the traditions and symbols that represent the Italian identity and culture, such as the flag, the anthem, the coat of arms, and the national motto: “L’Italia e’ una Repubblica fondata sul lavoro” (Italy is a Republic founded on work).

Stay in touch with your home country

Maintain regular contact with your family and friends back home. Share your experiences, feelings, and challenges with them. Ask them about their lives and news. Send them photos, videos, and souvenirs. Celebrate your home country’s holidays and special occasions. Use technology such as phone, email, social media, or video calls to stay connected. This will help you to feel supported, loved, and less lonely. You can also find other people from your home country who live in Italy, and join their communities and networks. You can also access your home country’s media and entertainment, such as newspapers, magazines, TV shows, and movies, online or through satellite.

Take care of yourself

Eat well, exercise regularly, and get enough sleep. Find ways to relax and unwind, such as listening to music, reading a book, or meditating. Seek professional help if you feel overwhelmed. Remember to celebrate your achievements and enjoy your experience. Living in a new country can be challenging, but also rewarding and enriching. You can learn a lot from Italy and its people, and also share your own culture and perspective with them. You can make the most of your time in Italy by being prepared, open-minded, curious, respectful, and positive. Buona fortuna! (Good luck!)

 

Read more about: 

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums

A Guide to Living in Italy with a Dog

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

This winter has presented quite the challenge for snow enthusiasts in and around Lazio. While neighboring regions like Abruzzo boast (some) pockets of powdery delight, Lazio seems to have been bypassed by Jack Frost himself. Sure, there may be a dusting of snow at higher altitudes – think 1800 to 2000 meters – but overall, it’s shaping up to be one of the toastiest winters in recent memory.

But fear not, fellow skiers and snowboarders! Even in the absence of natural snow, there are still opportunities to carve up the slopes and feel that rush of cold air against your face. Thanks to the wonders of modern technology, some ski resorts have invested in artificial snow-making machines, ensuring that winter sports aficionados can still indulge in their passion, even if the landscape resembles a springtime meadow.

Where to Go Skiing in and Around Lazio (Despite Lack of Snow) 54

So, where can you get your fix of downhill thrills without straying too far from the Eternal City? Look no further than Abruzzo. Nestled just a stone’s throw away from Rome, Abruzzo’s ski facilities offer a welcome escape for those craving some snowy adventures.

Here’s a rundown of the current ski scene in and around Rome as of February 23, 2024:

Abruzzo:

1. Campo Felice: With two tracks open, Campo Felice is a prime destination for skiers and snowboarders alike. Check out their website for the latest updates.

2. Ovindoli: Another option boasting two open tracks, Ovindoli promises excitement and stunning mountain views. For more information, click here.

3. Campo Imperatore: For those seeking a truly unforgettable experience, Campo Imperatore beckons with its open slopes and pristine beauty. Explore more here.

Where to Go Skiing in and Around Lazio (Despite Lack of Snow) 55

Lazio:

Unfortunately, the ski facilities within Lazio proper have yet to receive their snowy blessings. As of now, the following locations remain closed:

– Campo Staffi
– Terminillo. Check their website for any updates.
– Monte Livata
– Campo Stella – Leonessa
– Campo Catino

Before embarking on your snowy escapade, be sure to contact your chosen ski resort to confirm their operating status. Weather conditions can be unpredictable, and temporary closures may occur at short notice.

While it may not be the winter wonderland we had hoped for, don’t let a lack of natural snow dampen your spirits. With a bit of creativity and a willingness to adapt, you can still make this season one to remember. Also, it’s a great season for hiking! So grab your gear, round up your fellow powder hounds, and hit the slopes – artificial snow or not, adventure awaits!

Happy skiing!
Sal

 


 

Where to Go Skiing in and Around Lazio (Despite Lack of Snow) 56

 

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If you love art and culture, and you live, study, or work in Rome or its metropolitan area, you may want to get the MIC card. The MIC card is a special card that gives you free or reduced access to the museums and some archaeological and historical sites of the city for one year. It costs only 5 euros and it can be easily obtained online or at some venues. In this article, we will explain what the MIC card is, what benefits it offers, and how to get it step by step.

What is the MIC card?

The MIC card stands for Musei in Comune card, which means Museums in the Municipality card. It is a card that allows you to access the network of museums and some archaeological and historical sites of Rome for free or with a reduced ticket for one year. The network includes over 20 venues, such as the Capitoline Museums, the Ara Pacis Museum, the Trajan’s Markets, the Villa of the Quintilii, and many more. You can check the complete and updated list of affiliated venues here.

The MIC card is valid for adults who are residents, students, or domiciled in Rome or in the Metropolitan City of Rome. It is not available for tourists or visitors who do not have a regular residence permit in Italy. The card is personal and non-transferable, and it must be shown with a valid ID at the entrance of the venues.

What are the benefits of the MIC card?

The MIC card offers many benefits for those who love art and culture, such as:

– Free and unlimited access to the museums of the network, without any reservation or pre-sale fee;
– Free guided tours, subject to availability and booking;
– Direct skip-the-line access, without having to queue at the ticket office;
– Discounts in the cafes and bookshops of the museums;
– Reduced ticket for some exhibitions and sites that require separate ticketing, such as the Colosseum, the Palatine Hill, and the Roman Forum.

The MIC card is valid for one year from the date of activation, and it can be used as many times as you want. It is also valid for dependent family members, who can access the venues for free or with a reduced ticket, depending on their age and status.

How to get the MIC card?

The Mic Card can be purchased in digital version by downloading the Mic card app for Android or Ios or from the website miccard.roma.it.

Proceed as follows:

– Connect to the website or download the app;
– Click on “Acquista ora” (Buy Now);
– Scroll down until you reach the “Acquista ora” button;
– The order confirmation page will open with a total of 5 € + 1 € of pre-sale;
– Select the button to register if you are not our customer and follow the procedure to enter your personal data;
– Continue and fill in the format until the end;
– Tick the consents for the privacy law;
– Make the payment safely with GestPay;

You can buy it in physical and digital format at the same time by going to a ticket office of the Museums of Rome Capital with a valid identification document and with a certificate attesting the possession of the requirement (residence or domicile in Rome and in the Metropolitan City of Rome, enrollment in the current year at public or private universities present in the territory of Rome) and filling in the Request Data Holders Mic Card form.

 

How to receive the MIC Card?

By purchasing the Mic Card from the website miccard.roma.it or from the Mic Card app you will receive the card by email in Pdf format.

By purchasing the card at one of the ticket offices of the Museums of Rome Capital, you can choose to receive the card in physical format that will also be in digital format at the same time or only in digital format.

 

The MIC card is a great opportunity for art and culture lovers who live, study, or work in Rome or its metropolitan area. It gives you access to a rich and diverse network of museums and sites, with many advantages and discounts. It is easy to get and very affordable, and it lasts for one year.

 

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If you are living in Italy and you do not have access to the public health system through employment, pension, or other means, you may still be able to register voluntarily to the Regional Health Service (Sistemi Sanitari Regionali, SSR) and benefit from its services and coverage. However, this option is not available for everyone and it requires some conditions and procedures to be met. Here is what you need to know if you are interested in voluntary registration to the SSR.

What are the regional health systems in Italy?

The regional health systems in Italy, or Sistemi Sanitari Regionali (SSR), are the local implementations of the national health service, or Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN). Each region has the authority to plan and run its own health system, following the state’s standards and guidelines for the basic levels of care. The SSRs may vary in the quality, efficiency, suitability and openness of the services they offer, based on the resources, needs and preferences of each area.

 

Who can register voluntarily?

According to the law L. 213 of 30/12/2023 art. 1 co 240-241, voluntary registration to the SSR is possible for subjects who have the following requirements:

– They are Italian citizens or citizens of the European Union or of countries with which Italy has bilateral agreements on health care.

– They are not registered with any other form of compulsory health insurance, either in Italy or abroad.

– They have a regular residence permit in Italy, if they are non-EU citizens.

– They have a regular income, declared in Italy or abroad, for the year preceding the registration.

However, there are some exceptions and limitations to this option. For instance, foreign citizens who have entered Italy for reasons of tourism, business, medical treatment cannot make voluntary registration to the SSR, but they can access the services and services provided by paying the full relative rates. Also, for subjects who do not have their own income, reference is made to the income of the subject to whom they are dependent. In the event that the subject is not fiscally dependent on family members (unless he is a minor child), or in cases where this tax burden is not documented (also by self-certification) for each registered subject, at least the minimum quota must be paid.

 

How to register voluntarily?

The voluntary registration to the SSR is formalized with two steps:

– Compilation of the appropriate form: Modulo d’Iscrizione Volontaria al Servizio Sanitario Regionale. This form can be obtained from the local health authority (ASL) of your residence. The form must be filled in with your personal data, income, and family situation, and signed in front of an official of the ASL or by a public officer.

– Payment of the due contribution. The annual contribution for voluntary registration is determined pursuant to DM 8 October 1986 and is calculated as a percentage of the income of the previous year. The contribution is not divisible, does not have retroactive effect and is valid for the calendar year in which it is paid: the registration therefore expires in any case on 31 December of each year, regardless of the date of payment.

· The contribution cannot be less than € 2,000.00 and is also valid for dependent family members.

· For those staying with a Residence Permit for study reasons, the contribution is equal to € 700.00 (only if the student does not have income other than scholarships or economic subsidies granted by Italian public bodies).

· For those placed on a par, the contribution is equal to € 1,200.00.

For students and those placed on a par, if they have dependent family members, the amount of the contribution must be calculated according to the general methods. 

The contribution due must be made with model F24, indicating the tax code, the region code, and the reference year of registration with the SSN.

What are the benefits of voluntary registration?

By registering voluntarily to the SSR, you can access the same services and benefits as the compulsory insured, such as:

– Choosing your general practitioner and pediatrician;

– Having access to specialist visits, diagnostic tests, hospitalizations, and treatments, with the same co-payments and exemptions as the compulsory insured;

– Having access to the essential levels of care (LEA), which include preventive, curative, rehabilitative, and palliative services, as well as pharmaceuticals and medical devices;

– Having access to emergency and urgent care, both in Italy and abroad, within the limits of the agreements between the regions and the countries involved.

 

Voluntary registration to the SSR can be a valuable option for those who do not have other forms of health coverage in Italy and who meet the necessary requirements. However, it is important to be well informed about the procedures, costs, and benefits involved, and to compare them with other possible alternatives, such as private health insurance or supplementary health funds. If you have any doubts or questions, you can contact the local health authority (ASL) of your residence or the Ministry of Health for more information and guidance.

 

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Our founder, Patrizia Di Gregorio, brings 23 years of experience assisting expats in Italy to adapt to various aspects of life, including immigration, work, learning Italian, accommodation, networking, and making friends. Her expertise led to an interview with Business Insider, where she shared insights on three common mistakes American expats should avoid when relocating to Italy.

Moving to Italy? Here's 3 mistakes American expats should avoid 57

Read more here.

 

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New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums


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Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
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From February 6, 2024 to December 31, 2025, the Capitoline Museums in Rome will host a spectacular exhibition featuring the life-sized reconstruction of the Colossus of Constantine, one of the most impressive statues of ancient Rome. The exhibition, which is free of charge, will take place in the gardens of Villa Caffarelli, where visitors can admire the colossal figure of the emperor who changed the course of history.

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 58

Who was Constantine?

Constantine (306-337 AD) was the first Roman emperor to embrace Christianity and to move the capital of the empire from Rome to Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul). He is also known for his military achievements, such as his victory over Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge in 312 AD, which made him the sole ruler of the western part of the empire.

What is the Colossus of Constantine?

The Colossus of Constantine is a huge statue that was made in the early 4th century AD to celebrate the emperor’s power and divinity. It is estimated that the statue was about 12 meters tall and weighed about 40 tons. It was an acrolith, meaning that the head, hands, feet, and other exposed parts were made of marble, while the rest of the body was covered with bronze or marble drapery. The statue was probably placed inside a temple or a basilica, where it would have dominated the space with its imposing presence.

How was the Colossus of Constantine discovered?

The Colossus of Constantine was lost for centuries until the end of the 15th century, when nine marble fragments of the statue were found near the Basilica of Maxentius, where the statue may have originally stood. The fragments were acquired by the Capitoline Museums and displayed in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori, where they still remain today. The fragments include the head, the right arm, the left hand, the right knee, the left shin, the right foot, and three pieces of the drapery.

What is the significance of the Colossus of Constantine?

The Colossus of Constantine is not only a masterpiece of ancient art, but also a symbol of the transition from paganism to Christianity in the Roman empire. The statue was made by reusing and modifying an older statue of a bearded emperor or god, possibly Jupiter Optimus Maximus, the chief deity of the Roman pantheon. By transforming the statue into his own likeness, Constantine claimed to be the companion of the gods and the supreme ruler of the empire. The statue also shows the influence of the Homeric tradition, as the bare knee of the emperor is a sign of his authority and benevolence.

What can visitors expect from the exhibition?

The exhibition will offer visitors a unique opportunity to see the Colossus of Constantine in its original dimensions and proportions, thanks to a faithful reconstruction based on scientific and artistic criteria. The reconstruction will be placed in the gardens of Villa Caffarelli, where it will create a striking contrast with the modern cityscape. The exhibition will also feature informative panels, multimedia displays, and other materials that will illustrate the historical and cultural context of the statue, as well as the techniques and challenges involved in its creation and restoration. The exhibition will be a memorable experience for anyone interested in ancient Rome and its legacy.

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 59

The display of the Colossus at Villa Caffarelli

The Colossus of Constantine has a fascinating connection with the Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, the most important temple in ancient Rome. The temple, dedicated to the Capitoline triad of Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, was located on the Capitoline Hill, where the Villa Caffarelli Garden now stands. This is where the life-sized reconstruction of the Colossus of Constantine is displayed in the exhibition.

The temple was built in 509 BC and underwent several renovations and restorations over the centuries. The cult statue of Jupiter, the king of the gods, was also changed several times. The first statue was made of terracotta by a sculptor from Veio, while the later ones were inspired by the famous statue of Zeus by Phidias, the Greek master who created the statue of Zeus at Olympia, one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. The statues of Jupiter were made of marble, with the naked parts attached to a wooden frame covered with metal or marble drapery. The god was depicted sitting on a throne, with his chest, arms, and one knee exposed.

The temple and the statue of Jupiter were damaged by a lightning strike in the early 3rd century AD. This may have been the opportunity for Constantine to reuse the statue and transform it into his own image, as a sign of his divine power and authority. He moved the statue to the Basilica of Maxentius, the last great public building of ancient Rome, where he placed it in a prominent position along the Via Sacra, the sacred road that led to the Roman Forum.

The exhibition allows visitors to appreciate the relationship between the Colossus of Constantine and the Temple of Jupiter, as well as to see the remains of the temple that are still visible in the Exedra of Marcus Aurelius, inside the Capitoline Museums. The exhibition also showcases a historical relief that depicts a sacrifice at the temple of Capitoline Jupiter, performed by Emperor Marcus Aurelius in the 2nd century AD. The relief, which is also preserved in the Capitoline Museums, shows the splendid decoration of the temple’s pediment, with statues of gods and goddesses.

How the Colossus of Constantine was brought back to life

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 60

The representatives of Factum Foundation, Sovrintendenza Capitolina and Fondazione Prada during the
progress check inside Factum Foundation’s workshop.

The Colossus of Constantine is a stunning example of how modern technology can help preserve and recreate ancient art. The project to reconstruct the colossal statue was a collaboration between the Sovrintendenza Capitolina, the Fondazione Prada, and the Factum Foundation for Digital Technology in Preservation, a leading company in the field of digitization of works of art. The project started in 2022, on the occasion of the exhibition Recycling Beauty, where the Colossus was first displayed. The project was completed in 2024, when the Colossus was moved to its natural location in the Villa Caffarelli Garden, next to the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter.

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 61

Tests for the final Parian marble effect on the facsimile fragments.

The project was based on an archaeological hypothesis that the Colossus was seated and made of marble and bronze. The Factum Foundation used photogrammetry, a technique that uses photographs to create 3D models, to document the ten known fragments of the statue, which are preserved in the courtyard of the Palazzo dei Conservatori and at the Parco Archeologico del Colosseo. The Factum Foundation also used photogrammetry of a cast of a statue of Emperor Claudius as Jupiter, which is now in the Ara Pacis, to model the pose and draping of the Colossus. The Factum Foundation also consulted literary and epigraphic sources and compared the Colossus with other seated statues from the imperial period to reconstruct the missing details.

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 62

Factum Foundation re-creating the Colossus of Constantine, 2022.

The Factum Foundation then used 3D printing to make positive casts of the fragments and the recreated sections of the statue. The casts were coated with different materials to imitate the original appearance of the statue. The fragments were coated with a gesso mix and painted to resemble the weathered marble. The recreated sections were coated with resin mixed with marble powder and mica to achieve a clean white color. The cloak and the bronze elements were coated with resin mixed with bronze powder and gilded with gold foil.

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums 63

A section of the recreated Colossus of Constantine inside Factum Foundation’s workshop.

The original Colossus was about 13 meters tall and had an internal structure made of brick, wood, and metal. The reconstruction used an aluminum support structure, which makes it easier to assemble and disassemble. The reconstruction is faithful to the original dimensions and proportions of the statue, and gives visitors a chance to see the Colossus of Constantine as it once was.

Information

Location

Capitoline Museums , garden of Villa Caffarelli

Hours

From February 6, 2024 Every day from 9.30 am to 6.30 pm

Admission

Free entry

Information

Tel. 060608 (every day from 9.00 am to 7.00 pm)

 

Photos from Musei in Comune Roma

 

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The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
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Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

One question I’m often asked is whether it’s possible to bring dogs on a hike. As usual, the answer is: it depends.

In this article, we’ll specifically explore the situation in Lazio to ensure a positive and safe experience for you and your furry friend, especially when exploring the beautiful parks around Rome!

Many National and Regional Parks have strict rules regarding dogs on treks. These rules aren’t just to inconvenience you (although it may sometimes feel that way), but are often in place to protect you, your dog, and the wildlife.

At the end of this article, I’ll also share a quick way to check if you can bring your dog to a certain park area or not (Regional and National Parks).

Things You Should Know Before Going on a Hike with Dog around Rome 64

 

First, why are there restrictions on bringing dogs?

Some of the reasons are:

▪  To protect mammals and birds from stress or death (e.g., if your dog’s hunting instincts kick in).

▪ Health reasons: our pets can carry deadly diseases that are dangerous to the Parks’ fauna (think Canine distemper virus).

▪ To protect dogs from diseases they aren’t vaccinated against, some of which could also be passed on to humans.

▪ Arthropods/parasites are present in some areas, such as ticks and harvest mites, which can be passed on to humans and carry diseases like TBE and Lyme disease.

It’s important to familiarize yourself with each park’s regulations, but as a general rule, dogs are allowed in Regional Parks and in some areas of National Parks, with a few caveats:

▪ They must be on a leash at all times.

▪ They are only allowed on official trails or public roads.

▪ They are not allowed in Zone A restricted areas (typically, parks are divided into four protected areas, with Zone A being off-limits and fully protected).

Some parks can be even dangerous for you and your dogs. In bear country (especially near the border with Abruzzo), you have bears and wolves that can pose a danger to you and your four-legged friend. If left to roam freely, your dog might return with an unwanted surprise chasing it.

Things You Should Know Before Going on a Hike with Dog around Rome 65

So let’s look at a few do’s and don’ts when visiting a Regional or National Park with your dog:

Do’s:

1. Check Park Regulations:
▪ Before heading out, familiarize yourself with the specific regulations of the park you plan to visit. Each park may have different rules regarding dogs, leash requirements, and designated trails. Some (although very few) parks even have designated trails for dogs. For example,: Here you have a map with trails that are allowed to do in the Parco Nazionale d’Abruzzo, Lazio e Molise, while it is forbidden to visit the rest of the park with your dog.

2. Leash Etiquette:
▪ Keep your dog on a leash, especially in crowded areas or where wildlife may be present. This ensures the safety of your pet, other hikers, and local wildlife.
▪ Tip: Choose a sturdy, comfortable leash that allows your dog some freedom while maintaining control. As mentioned before, in most areas a leash is mandatory. Even in smaller parks, such as Caffarella Park, which is part of Parco Regionale dell’Appia Antica, you risk a fine if you don’t respect this rule (though there are designated, fenced dog park areas in Caffarella Park).

3. Hydration and Snacks:
▪ Carry sufficient water for both you and your dog, especially on warmer days. Bring dog-friendly snacks for energy.
▪ Tip: Portable dog bowls are convenient for providing water breaks.

4. Know Your Dog’s Limits:
▪ Be mindful of your dog’s fitness level and health. Choose trails that match their endurance and consider their age, breed, and any health conditions.
▪ Tip: Start with shorter trails and gradually increase the difficulty as your dog builds stamina.

Don’ts:

1. Off-Leash Disregard:
▪ Respect leash regulations and avoid letting your dog off-leash where prohibited. This helps prevent accidents and conflicts with other park visitors.
▪ Tip: Utilize designated off-leash areas if available.

2. Wildlife Interaction:
▪ Discourage your dog from approaching wildlife. Keep a safe distance to protect both your pet and the local fauna.
▪ Tip: Carry bear bells or make noise in areas where encounters with wildlife are possible. Read up on whether or not there are wolves, or Maremmana guard dogs, or other potential hazards present in the area where you’re planning to hike. While rare, small dogs left running alone in areas known to be inhabited by wolf packs can be dangerous to both you and your dog.

3. Neglect Waste Cleanup:
▪ Description: Always clean up after your dog. Carry waste bags and dispose of them properly in designated bins.
▪ Tip: Pack extra waste bags to be prepared for unexpected situations.

Regulations and Additional Considerations:

1. Seasonal Restrictions:
▪ Description: Some parks may have seasonal restrictions. Check for any closures, especially during wildlife mating or nesting seasons.

So you might wonder: “How do I know if it’s allowed to bring a dog to a Park around Rome?”

There are two ways to do this:

▪  Use the Park Locator , click on the region (at the moment dogs are tracked for Lazio only) and instantly see if there is a dog sign. By clicking on the dog Emoji, you will be forwarded either to a designated dog trail map (if it exists), or in most cases to the Park Regulations. Just search for (“cane”, “cani”, or “guinzaglio” within the document if you want to find more details). You can also use the Park Locator to identify the website of each park, where you can see the latest news of each park. Note that at the moment the Park Locator works best on a Desktop Computer.

▪  Use Parks.it to find more information about specific parks that you’d like to visit.

Things You Should Know Before Going on a Hike with Dog around Rome 66

The Park Locator is a quick way to instantly find maps, links, permits and other useful information.

 


Keep yourself and your dog safe by planning ahead before heading out into nature with your dog! When in doubt, call the local Park Rangers (the contact numbers are typically found on the website of each Regional or National Park) to double-check.

As always, stay fit, hike a bit!

Things You Should Know Before Going on a Hike with Dog around Rome 67

 

Read more about: 

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums

A Guide to Living in Italy with a Dog

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

 

Residing in the heart of Rome immerses you in a rich tapestry of history and urban life. Yet, for expats yearning for a break from the city’s hustle, the Roman countryside presents a myriad of charming day-trip destinations. Here is your guide to rejuvenating excursions amidst the natural beauty surrounding the Eternal City.

1. Tivoli – Exploring Villa d’Este and Hadrian’s Villa

Commence your countryside exploration with a venture to Tivoli, an enchanting town east of Rome. Delve into the UNESCO World Heritage sites of Villa d’Este and Hadrian’s Villa, where manicured gardens and historic architecture weave a captivating tale. Another highly recommended visit is Villa Gregoriana, although bear in mind that, at the time of writing, they reopen in March. Tivoli is also one of my favorite hiking destinations. Monte Catillo is a raw, rugged experience for regular hikers.

2. Lake Bracciano

For a tranquil day by the water, venture northwest to Lake Bracciano. Stroll along the lakeside promenade, paddleboat on the serene waters, or indulge in a lakeside repast in the town of Bracciano. The medieval charm of Castello Orsini-Odescalchi (fun fact: Tom Cruise got married there – back in 2006) adds to the allure of the surroundings. Of course you could also hike around the lake, although personally I prefer driving a bit further (e.g. Manziana, or Oriolo) and hike in the forests there.

3. Cerveteri – Etruscan Tombs and Coastal Retreat

Merge history with relaxation in Cerveteri. Explore the UNESCO-listed Etruscan Necropolis, followed by a walk along the dunes at Marina di Cerveteri, or Santa Severa Beach for a stroll along the Tyrrhenian Sea. If you’re into hiking, Cerveteri is a great starting point for the adventurous Etruscan Trail, or Waterfall Trail (also known as Sentiero degli Etruschi / Sentiero delle Cascatelle).

Escape to Nature: Day Trips in the Roman Countryside 68

 

4. Subiaco – Seeking Solitude at the Monastery:

Nestled in the Simbruini Mountains, Subiaco offers a peaceful haven for expats seeking solace. Visit the Sacred Cave of St. Benedict and the imposing Subiaco Monastery. A leisurely mountain hike promises breathtaking vistas and a communion with nature. Subiaco is also accessible by bus, with departures from Anagnina (Metro A), Ponte Mammolo (Metro B), for an updated timetable of busses, visit the Cotral website.

5. Nemi – The Tranquil Waters of Lake Diana

Known as the “Mirror of Diana,” Lake Nemi is ensconced in verdant woodlands. Explore the charming town of Nemi, celebrated for its strawberries, and meander along the lake’s shores. Delve into history at the Museo delle Navi Romane, showcasing ancient Roman vessels.

Escape to Nature: Day Trips in the Roman Countryside 69

6. Castel Gandolfo – Papal Gardens and Albano Lake

Retreat to the Papal summer residence in Castel Gandolfo. Roam the meticulously landscaped Papal Gardens, boasting panoramic views of Albano Lake. Indulge in a lakeside repast in the town and embark on a serene boat excursion on the placid lake. Of course, there are many interesting hiking trails to be found, as the lake is part of a Regional Park, called “Parco Regionale dei Castelli Romani”.

7. Calcata – Artistic Enclave in the Woodlands

For a bohemian escapade, set your sights on Calcata, a medieval village embraced by dense forests. This artistic haven exudes a unique ambiance with its cobblestone streets, art studios, and a castle. Traverse the surrounding woodlands for a culturally infused nature experience. Of course also here you have interesting options for hikes, including the peaceful “Treja Valley”.

Escape to Nature: Day Trips in the Roman Countryside 70

 


The Roman countryside unfolds a diverse array of day-trip possibilities for expats seeking respite from the urban rhythm. Whether your preference leans towards historical landmarks, lakeside serenity, or mountain seclusion, these destinations promise a perfect retreat into the embrace of nature. Plan your day excursion, rejuvenate your spirit, and relish the natural beauty surrounding the Roman countryside.

Of course, there are plenty of opportunities for hikes around all of these areas! For a map of hikes that are accessible by train, click here.

Escape to Nature: Day Trips in the Roman Countryside 71

 

Read more about: 

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums

A Guide to Living in Italy with a Dog

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Italy is one of the most dog-friendly destinations in Europe, with many places that welcome dogs and offer them a great quality of life. However, there are also some rules and regulations that you need to be aware of if you want to travel or move to Italy with your dog. In this article, we will share some of our experiences and tips on living in Italy with a dog.

Pet Culture

With around 40.2% of households having at least one animal, Italy is one of the most pet-friendly countries in the world. It ranks first for being most dog-friendly, based on animal protection laws, the number of vets, pet-friendly hotels and restaurants, and the like. Italians love their pets and treat them as part of the family, often spoiling them with gifts, clothes, and accessories. You will see many dogs walking with their owners on the streets, in the parks, and even in some shops and offices. Dogs are generally allowed in restaurants, cafes, and bars, as long as they are small and well-behaved. Some of them even provide water bowls, treats, and dog menus. However, it is always polite to ask the staff before entering with your dog, and to keep your dog on a leash and under control.

 

Potentially Dangerous Breeds

Currently, there are no breeds that are banned from being taken to Italy. However, following the Italian law, Rottweilers and Doberman Pinschers are considered dangerous and are therefore not allowed to enter Venice. In Italy, several breeds are currently considered dangerous, such as Rottweiler, Pit Bull Terrier, Tosa Inu, Dogo Argentino, Yugoslavian Shepherd Dog and Brazillian Mastiff, among others. In such cases, the owners of such ‘dangerous’ breeds have to ensure public safety by:

– Walking their dogs on a leash that doesn’t exceed 1.5 metres.
– Ensuring their dog wears a muzzle and is kept on a leash in public places such as the public transport.
– Registering their dog in the Anagrafe Canina (dog registry) with their microchip identification.
– Obtaining a certificate of suitability for the possession of the dog from a veterinarian.
– Obtaining a third-party liability insurance for the dog.

 

Pet Insurance

One of the first things you need to consider when living in Italy with a dog is pet insurance. Pet insurance is not mandatory in Italy, but it can be very useful in case of accidents, illnesses, or injuries that may require veterinary care. Veterinary costs in Italy can vary depending on the region, the clinic, and the treatment, but they are generally lower than in other European countries. However, some procedures or medications can still be expensive, especially if your dog has a chronic condition or needs surgery. Therefore, having pet insurance can help you cover some or all of these expenses and give you peace of mind.

 

There are different types of pet insurance available in Italy, depending on the coverage and the price. Some of the most common ones are:

– Third-party liability insurance: This type of insurance covers the damages that your dog may cause to other people or their property. This is especially important if you have a large or potentially dangerous breed, as you may be held responsible for any harm or injury that your dog may inflict. Third-party liability insurance is also required by law if you want to travel with your dog on public transport or enter some public places. The cost of this insurance can vary depending on the breed, the age, and the health of your dog, but it usually ranges from 30 to 100 euros per year.

– Health insurance: This type of insurance covers the veterinary expenses that your dog may incur due to illness or injury. This can include consultations, tests, medications, surgeries, hospitalizations, and even alternative therapies. The cost of this insurance can vary depending on the coverage, the deductible, the co-payment, and the limits of the policy, but it usually ranges from 100 to 300 euros per year.

– Travel insurance: This type of insurance covers the risks and inconveniences that you and your dog may face when travelling abroad. This can include medical expenses, repatriation, cancellation, loss of luggage, theft, and legal assistance. The cost of this insurance can vary depending on the destination, the duration, and the coverage of the trip, but it usually ranges from 10 to 50 euros per trip.

One the most popular and reliable pet insurance companies in Italy is Allianz, which offers a comprehensive pet insurance plan that covers both third-party liability and health expenses for dogs and cats. The plan also includes a 24/7 helpline, a network of partner veterinarians, and a free pet ID tag.

Pet-Friendly Places

Another thing you need to consider when living in Italy with a dog is finding pet-friendly places where you and your dog can enjoy your time together. Italy is a very pet-friendly country, with many places that allow dogs and offer them a great service. Here are some of the most common pet-friendly places in Italy:

 

Restaurants and cafes: Most restaurants and cafes in Italy welcome dogs, especially if they are small and well-behaved. Some of them even provide water bowls, treats, and dog menus. However, it is always polite to ask the staff before entering with your dog, and to keep your dog on a leash and under control. Some of the best dog-friendly restaurants and cafes in Italy are:

– Pizzacoteca: Pizzacoteca is a pizzeria and bakery in Milan that offers delicious pizzas, salads, sandwiches, and desserts. Dogs are welcome inside and outside, and they can enjoy a slice of pizza or a biscuit for free.

– God Save The Food: God Save The Food is a restaurant and cafe chain in Milan that offers healthy and tasty dishes, from breakfast to dinner. Dogs are welcome inside and outside, and they can enjoy a bowl of water and a treat.

– Fiuto: Fiuto is a restaurant in Rome that caters to dogs and their owners. It offers a menu for dogs that is curated by a veterinarian, as well as dishes for humans that are inspired by the Mediterranean cuisine. Fiuto also provides water bowls, treats, and special trolleys for dogs to enjoy their dining experience

 

Parks and gardens: Many parks and gardens in Italy allow dogs, as long as they are on a leash and you pick up after them. Some of them even have designated dog areas where your dog can run and play off-leash. Some of the best parks and gardens in Italy are:

– Villa Borghese: Villa Borghese is a large and beautiful park in Rome that features fountains, statues, museums, and a lake. Dogs are allowed in most areas of the park, except for the museums and the zoo. There is also a dog area, where your dog can socialize with other dogs.

– Parco Sempione: Parco Sempione is a large and green park in Milan that features a castle, an arch, a tower, and a pond. Dogs are allowed in most areas of the park, except for the castle and the tower. There is also a dog area, where your dog can run and play off-leash.

– Giardino Bardini: Giardino Bardini is a beautiful and romantic garden in Florence that features flowers, statues, fountains, and a panoramic view of the city. Dogs are allowed in most areas of the garden, as long as they are on a leash and you pay a small entrance fee.

 

Beaches and lakes: Many beaches and lakes in Italy allow dogs, especially during the low season. Some of them even have dedicated dog beaches or dog areas where your dog can swim and sunbathe. Some of the best beaches and lakes in Italy are:

– Lido di Fido: Lido di Fido is a dog-friendly beach in Grado, near Venice, that offers a sandy beach, a shallow sea, and a lot of amenities for dogs and owners. Dogs can enjoy a bowl of water, a shower, a sunbed, and a parasol. There is also a veterinary service, a dog trainer, and a dog shop.

– Bau Beach: Bau Beach is a dog-friendly beach in Maccarese, near Rome, that offers a sandy beach, a clean sea, and a lot of facilities for dogs and owners. Dogs can enjoy a bowl of water, a shower, a sunbed, and a parasol. There is also a veterinary service, a dog trainer, and a dog shop. You can find more information and the prices on their website.

– Lago di Braies: Lago di Braies is a stunning lake in the Dolomites, near Bolzano, that offers a crystal-clear water, a mountain scenery, and a lot of activities for dogs and owners. Dogs can enjoy a swim, a hike, a boat ride, and a picnic. There is also a hotel, a restaurant, and a souvenir shop. You can find more information and the prices on their website.

 

Supermarkets

One of the last things you need to consider when living in Italy with a dog is finding supermarkets where you can shop with your dog. Supermarkets in Italy have different policies when it comes to dogs, depending on the size, the location, and the management of the store. Some of them allow dogs, some of them forbid dogs, and some of them offer special trolleys for dogs. Here are some of the most common supermarkets in Italy and their dog policies:

Carrefour: Carrefour is a French supermarket chain that has many stores in Italy, from hypermarkets to express shops. Carrefour is one of the most dog-friendly supermarkets in Italy, as it offers special trolleys for dogs in some of its stores. These trolleys have a padded seat, a safety belt, and a cover to protect your dog from the sun or rain. You can find these trolleys near the entrance of the store, and you can use them for free. However, you have to follow some rules, such as:

– Your dog must weigh less than 10 kg and be clean and healthy.
– Your dog must wear a collar and a leash, and you must hold the leash at all times.
– Your dog must not bark, bite, or disturb other customers or staff.
– You must not leave your dog unattended in the trolley or in the car.
– You must clean the trolley after use and return it to its place.

Lidl: Lidl is a German supermarket chain that has many stores in Italy, mainly discount shops. Lidl does not allow dogs inside its stores, except for guide dogs or service dogs. However, some of its stores have dog parking areas outside, where you can leave your dog while you shop. These areas have metal poles with rings, where you can attach your dog’s leash. They also have water bowls and shade to keep your dog comfortable. However, you have to follow some rules, such as:

– Your dog must wear a collar and a leash, and you must lock the leash to the ring.
– Your dog must not bark, bite, or disturb other customers or staff.
– You must not leave your dog for more than 15 minutes in the parking area.
– You must not leave your dog in the parking area if the weather is too hot or cold.

Coop: Coop is an Italian supermarket chain that has many stores in Italy, from supermarkets to convenience stores. Coop does not have a uniform policy for dogs, as it depends on the local regulations and the discretion of the store manager. Some of its stores allow dogs, some of them forbid dogs, and some of them have special trolleys for dogs. You can check the policy of each store on their website or by asking the staff. If the store allows dogs, you have to follow some rules, such as:

– Your dog must wear a collar and a leash, and you must hold the leash at all times.
– Your dog must not bark, bite, or disturb other customers or staff.
– Your dog must not enter the areas where food is exposed or prepared, such as the bakery, the butcher, or the deli.
– You must clean up after your dog if it makes a mess.

Living in Italy with a dog can be a rewarding and enjoyable experience, as Italy is a very pet-friendly country that offers many opportunities for you and your dog to have fun and relax. However, you also have to respect some rules and regulations that aim to ensure the safety and the well-being of your dog, yourself, and others. By following these tips, you can make the most of your time in Italy with your dog, and create some unforgettable memories.

 

Read more about: 

The Dog-Friendly Restaurant in Rome with Tailored Dog Menus and Training Perks

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission

The Colossal Statue of Constantine: FREE Exhibition at the Capitoline Museums


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

How to enjoy Italy’s cultural treasures for free

Did you know that you can visit many of Italy’s museums and archeological parks for free on the last Sunday of each month? Whether you are an expat living in Italy or a tourist looking for a cultural experience, here are some tips on how to make the most of this initiative.

What is the free museum Sunday?

The free museum Sunday, or Domenica al Museo, is an initiative launched by the Ministry of Culture in 2014 to promote access to culture and art for everyone. It allows free entry to over 400 state-owned museums, monuments, and archeological sites across Italy on the last Sunday of each month. Some of the most famous attractions that participate in this initiative include the Colosseum, the Uffizi Gallery, the Pompeii ruins, and the Vatican Museums.

However, not all museums and sites are part of this initiative, so it is advisable to check the official website of the Ministry of Culture before planning your visit. Also, keep in mind that some places may require a reservation, especially during peak seasons, and that some may have reduced opening hours or be closed for maintenance.

How to choose where to go?

With so many options to choose from, it can be hard to decide where to go on the free museum Sunday. One way to narrow down your choices is to consider your location and interests. Italy is divided into 20 regions, each with its own distinctive culture, history, and landscape. Here are a list options to consider in the most popular Italian cities for expats:

– Milan: the economic and fashion capital of Italy, with a cosmopolitan and dynamic vibe. Some of the museums and sites you can visit for free in Milan are the Sforza Castle, the Pinacoteca di Brera, and the Archaeological Museum.

– Rome: the eternal city, with a wealth of ancient monuments, Renaissance art, and Baroque architecture. Some of the museums and sites you can visit for free in Rome are the Colosseum, the Roman Forum, the Palatine Hill, the National Gallery of Modern Art, and the Borghese Gallery.

– Florence: the cradle of the Renaissance, with a stunning artistic and cultural heritage. Some of the museums and sites you can visit for free in Florence are the Uffizi Gallery, the Accademia Gallery, the Bargello Museum, the Medici Chapels, and the Pitti Palace.

– Bologna: the gastronomic and academic center of Italy, with a lively and historic atmosphere. Some of the museums and sites you can visit for free in Bologna are the Archaeological Museum, the Medieval Museum, the Modern Art Museum, and the Basilica of San Petronio.

– Naples: the vibrant and chaotic city of the south, with a rich and diverse culture. Some of the museums and sites you can visit for free in Naples are the National Archaeological Museum, the Capodimonte Museum, the Royal Palace, and the Castel Sant’Elmo.

How to enjoy your visit?

Visiting a museum or a site on the free museum Sunday can be a rewarding and fun experience, but it can also be challenging and stressful. Here are some tips on how to enjoy your visit:

– Plan ahead: check the opening hours, the reservation policy, and the location of the museum or site you want to visit. You can also download a map or a guide of the place to have an idea of what to see and do.

– Arrive early: expect long queues and crowds, especially at the most popular attractions. Try to arrive as early as possible to avoid the rush and to have more time to explore.

– Be flexible: if you find that the place you want to visit is too crowded or closed, don’t be discouraged. You can always look for another option nearby or come back another time. You can also enjoy the surroundings of the museum or site, which are often beautiful and interesting.

– Be respectful: follow the rules and regulations of the museum or site, such as not touching the exhibits, not taking photos with flash, not eating or drinking, and not making noise. Also, be courteous and patient with the staff and other visitors.

– Have fun: don’t try to see everything or to learn everything. Choose what interests you the most and enjoy the experience. You can also make it more interactive and engaging by taking quizzes, playing games, or joining guided tours.

 

The free museum Sunday is a wonderful initiative that allows you to discover and appreciate Italy’s cultural treasures for free. Whether you are an expat living in Italy or a tourist visiting the country, you can take advantage of this opportunity to enrich your knowledge and have fun. All you need is some planning, some flexibility, and some curiosity.

 

Read more about: 

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission

How to Safely Snowshoe and avoid a fine in Italy

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Learn about Rome Winter Sales 2024


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Italy attracts many foreigners and expats who want to live, work, or study here. However, one of the challenges that they may face is opening a bank account in Italy. Banking in Italy can be complicated, especially for nonresidents who may not have an Italian address or a residence permit. Moreover, different banks may have different requirements, fees, and services for foreigners and expats.

In this article, we will guide you through the process of opening a bank account in Italy as a foreigner or expat. We will explain the different options available, depending on your residency status, address, and preferences. Finally, we will answer some of the frequently asked questions (FAQ) that foreigners and expats may have about banking in Italy.

If you are already a resident in Italy, or you have an Italian address, you can open a traditional account at any number of small regional banks or international banks like Deutsche Bank. You will need to provide your passport, tax code, proof of address, proof of employment or self-employment, and an anti-money laundering compliance. You will also need to fill in a lot of paperwork and pay some fees for maintenance, money transfers, or withdrawals.

If you are not yet a resident in Italy, or you do not have an Italian address, you can open an account with a digital bank like Revolut or N26. These banks offer online services, low fees, and multi-currency features. You will need to provide your passport, tax code, and proof of address in your home country. You will also need to verify your identity online and wait for your debit card to be delivered to your address.

If you do not need a full bank account, but only a way to send and receive money in Italy, you can use Wise. Wise is a money transfer service that lets you create a multi-currency account and get Italian bank details. You will need to provide your passport, tax code, and proof of address in your home country. You will also need to verify your identity online and pay a small fee for each transfer.

If you are a low-income or vulnerable person, you can open a basic bank account ( conto di base) at any bank in Italy. This account offers basic services, such as deposits, withdrawals, transfers, and a debit card, for free or for a low fee. You will need to provide your passport, tax code, proof of address, and proof of income or social assistance. You will also need to fill in a form and declare that you do not have any other bank accounts in Italy.

 

Some of the frequently asked questions (FAQ) about opening a bank account among expats in Italy are:

 

Can I open a bank account in Italy as a foreigner?

Yes, you can open a bank account in Italy as a foreigner, regardless of your citizenship or visa status. However, the process may vary depending on the bank and your residency status. If you have an Italian address and a residence permit, you can open a traditional account at any bank in Italy. If you do not have an Italian address or a residence permit, you can open an account with a digital bank like Revolut or N26, or use a money transfer service like Wise.

 

What are the requirements to open a bank account in Italy as a nonresident?

The requirements to open a bank account in Italy as a nonresident may differ from bank to bank, but the standard documents required are: a valid ID or passport, an Italian tax code, a residence certificate, and an anti-money laundering compliance. You may also need to provide proof of employment or self-employment, and a reference from your bank in your home country.

 

What are the best banks for expats in Italy?

The best banks for expats in Italy depend on your preferences and needs. Some of the most popular and trusted banks among Italians are Unicredit, Intesa Sanpaolo, and Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena. Some of the best international banks for expats are Deutsche Bank, ING, and BNL. Some of the best online banks for expats are Revolut, N26, and Fineco.

 

What are the fees and charges for banking in Italy?

The fees and charges for banking in Italy vary depending on the bank and the type of account you have. In general, there are three types of fees related to the management of a bank account: the stamp duty, which is required by law and equal for each type of account; the fixed fees, which include card fees, annual account management, and costs incurred by the bank for sending documents and statements; and the variable costs, which depend on the transactions you make, such as withdrawals, transfers, or overdrafts.

 

How can I transfer money to and from Italy?

You can transfer money to and from Italy using different methods, such as bank transfers, cash transfers, or online transfers. Bank transfers are usually the most secure and reliable way to send money, but they may also incur high fees and exchange rates. Cash transfers are convenient and fast, but they may also have high fees and security risks. Online transfers are usually the cheapest and easiest way to send money, but they may also have limitations on the amount and destination of the transfer. Some of the most popular services for online transfers are Western Union, Wise, and PayPal.

 

To open a bank account in Italy as a foreigner or expat, you just need to know your options, requirements, and preferences, and follow the steps and tips we have provided. Once you have your bank account in Italy, you will be able to manage your finances more easily.

 


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Carnival in Italy is a vibrant and lively celebration that takes place in the weeks leading up to Lent, which is the 40-day period of fasting and reflection before Easter. The exact dates of Carnival vary each year, as they are determined by the lunar calendar. However, it typically occurs in February or March. In 2024, Carnival in Italy will take place during the first 2 weeks of February.

There are many places in Italy where you can enjoy the festive atmosphere of Carnival, each with its own traditions and events. Some of the most famous and popular ones are:

Carnival of Venice

A Guide to Italy's Carnivals in 2024 72

This is one of the most famous carnivals in the world, renowned for its elaborate and unique masks and costumes. The Venice Carnival hosts a series of grand balls and parties in historic palaces and other unique venues throughout the city. There are also a variety of parades and processions that showcase the extravagant costumes, and traditional music and dance.

The theme of the Venice Carnival in 2024 is “Ad Oriente. The amazing journey of Marco Polo”. It is inspired by the 700th anniversary of the death of the famous Venetian explorer, who traveled to China and the Indies in the 14th century. The theme of travel is about discovery and coming face to face with different worlds and cultures, but also an intimate journey in ourselves.

Activities will take place from February 3 to February 24. Here are some of the highlights of the Carnival by date:

February 3: The Carnival will start with a spectacular opening ceremony on the Rio de Cannaregio, where you can enjoy music, lights, and performances on floating stages. Then, you can join the first masked float parade at 3 pm and admire the amazing papier-mâché floats that represent different themes and characters.
February 8: You can participate in the second masked float parade and also enter the best mask contest, where you can show off your creativity and originality. You might win a prize or even become the next angel or eagle of the Carnival.
February 11: The third masked float parade will take place at 6 pm. This time, you can also treat yourself to a gastronomic walk, where you can taste the local delicacies and specialties of Venice. You will discover the flavors and aromas of the Venetian cuisine, such as polenta, risotto, fritole, and more.
February 13: The fourth masked float parade and fireworks show will be a dazzling spectacle that you will not want to miss. You can watch the sky light up with colors and shapes and feel the festive atmosphere of the Carnival.
February 18: The fifth and final masked float parade will take place at 3 pm. There is also a historical re-enactment of the past of Venice, called the Festa delle Marie. You can witness the procession of the twelve brides who were offered jewels by the Doge as a sign of gratitude for their loyalty. The brides are selected among the most beautiful girls of Venice and parade in elaborate costumes from San Pietro di Castello to Piazza San Marco.
February 24: The Carnival will end with a grand finale, featuring the closing of the masked float parade at 5 pm, the award ceremony for the best mask contest, and the flights of the angel and the eagle. You can see the young woman dressed as an angel and the famous guest star dressed as an eagle fly over the square in spectacular costumes and applaud the winners of the contest. The Carnival will conclude with a stunning fireworks show that will leave you breathless.

Carnival of Viareggio

A Guide to Italy's Carnivals in 2024 73

This is one of the largest and longest carnivals in in Tuscany, Italy, lasting for several weekends. The highlight of this carnival is the bright parades of colossal paper mâché puppets that depict politicians, celebrities, animals and other figures. The puppets are accompanied by music and dancing figures in masks, and inflatable and plush objects are launched into the skies. The activities by date for the Carnival of Viareggio in 2024 are as follows:

February 3: Opening ceremony and first masked float parade at 3 pm.
February 8: Second masked float parade at 3 pm. There is also a mask contest with prizes.
February 11: Third masked float parade at 6 pm. There is also a gastronomic walk with local delicacies.
February 13: Fourth masked float parade and fireworks show.
February 18: Fifth and final masked float parade at 3 pm. There is also a historical re-enactment of the past of Cento.
February 24: Closing of the masked float parade at 5 pm. Award ceremony and fireworks show.

Carnival of Ivrea

A Guide to Italy's Carnivals in 2024 74

The Carnival of Ivrea is a historical and folkloric event that takes place every year in the town of Ivrea, in the Piedmont region of Italy, and dates back to 1808. It commemorates the medieval rebellion of the people against the tyrannical lord who imposed the right of the first night on the brides of his vassals. The highlight of the carnival is the Battle of the Oranges, where teams of people throw oranges at each other, representing the clash between the rebels and the lord’s guards. The carnival also features a parade of historical costumes, a bonfire of the scarli (wooden poles), and a bean feast. The dates and activities of the Carnival of Ivrea in 2024 are:

January 6: Opening of the carnival, official appointment of the General, salute of the Credendari to the Magnificent Podesta, and ceremony of the candles in the cathedral.
January 28: Bean feast, delivery of the book of minutes to the Substitute, and flag ceremony in the town square.
February 4: Presentation of the Vezzosa Mugnaia (the miller’s daughter who sparked the revolt), historical parade, grand ball, and fireworks on the river Dora.
February 9: Historical parade on foot, Battle of the Oranges, and parties of the Aranceri (orange throwers).
February 11: Planting of the scarli, historical parade, Battle of the Oranges, and parties of the Aranceri.
February 13: Historical parade, Battle of the Oranges, burning of the scarli, funeral of the carnival, and farewell of the General.

Carnival of Cento

A Guide to Italy's Carnivals in 2024 75

The Cento Carnival is a historic celebration that happens every year in Cento, in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. It is the only carnival in the world that has a partnership with the Rio de Janeiro carnival. It has amazing floats, music, live shows, and candy and confetti throwing.

The carnival dates back to 1615, when it was painted on a fresco by Gian Francesco Barbieri. A local character named “il Berlingaccio” makes the fresco come alive during the carnival. The Cento Carnival is also known for its floats with music and dancers in masks, and its sky-filling inflatables and plushies. The carnival lasts for five Sundays before Lent. The theme for the 2024 edition is “The Navel of the World”, and it will celebrate the arts, crafts, and traditions of the city of Cento, and the main dates and activities are:

January 28: Opening parade of the floats, with live music and street performers. The theme is “The Navel of the World”, celebrating the arts, crafts, and traditions of Cento. The parade starts at 2 pm and ends at 6:30 pm.
February 4: Second parade of the floats, with more live music and street performers. The parade starts at 2 pm and ends at 6:30 pm. There is also a mask contest, where participants can show off their creative costumes and win prizes.
February 11: Third parade of the floats, with even more live music and street performers. The parade starts at 2 pm and ends at 6:30 pm. There is also a gastronomic walk, where visitors can taste the local delicacies and specialties of Cento.
February 18: Fourth parade of the floats, with the best live music and street performers. The parade starts at 2 pm and ends at 6:30 pm. There is also a historical re-enactment, where actors and performers recreate the scenes and events of the past of Cento.
February 25: Final parade of the floats, with the most spectacular live music and street performers. The parade starts at 2 pm and ends at 6:30 pm. There is also the famous “gettito”, a shower of gifts and confetti thrown from the floats to the crowd.

 

Carnival of Putignano

A Guide to Italy's Carnivals in 2024 76

This is the oldest carnival in Europe, dating back to 1394. The carnival is celebrated with satirical and humorous floats, masks, and dances. The carnival also has a strong cultural and religious significance, as it incorporates ancient rituals and traditions of the local community in the town of Putignano. The theme for the 2024 edition is “Farinelite N630”, and the main dates and activities are:

February 4: Opening Party and First masked parade
February 9: Married women Thursday, Thursday’s parade and N’de Josr (music and good food in the old town)
February 11: Second masked parade
February 16: Married men Thursday, Thursday’s parade and Horns cutting off
February 13: The Greatest Show and Third masked parade
February 20: Last rites
February 17: Shrove Tuesday, Fourth masked parade and the ritual of the Campana dei Maccheroni (Macaroni Bell)

Carnival in Italy is a wonderful opportunity to experience the rich and diverse culture of this beautiful country. Whether you prefer the elegance and mystery of Venice, the creativity and humor of Viareggio, the history and bravery of Ivrea, or the tradition and joy of Cento, you will find something to suit your taste and mood.

 

Read more about: 

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

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Don’t Miss the Chance to Visit the Vatican Museums for Free

A Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums

Italy’s Most Enchanting Towns Accessible by Train

New Celio Archaeological Park in Rome – Free Admission

How to Safely Snowshoe and avoid a fine in Italy

Pay  a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Learn about Rome Winter Sales 2024


Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

Do you love ancient Rome? Then you will enjoy the new Celio Archaeological Park and Museum, which opened on Friday, January 12, 2024. The park and museum are on the Celio hill, where you can see many artifacts and monuments from Rome’s past.

You can visit the restored buildings in the area, such as the Casina del Salvi and the former GIL Gymnasium, where you can see the fragments of the Forma Urbis, a huge marble map of the city from the Severian age. You can also walk through the garden, where you can see various epigraphic and architectural materials from the late 19th-century excavations in Rome, organized by themes such as social life, religion, administration, and architecture.

The park and museum are in a green area facing the Colosseum and near other important archaeological sites, such as the temple of the Divo Claudio. The artifacts on display tell the history of the Capitoline Collections and Rome, the Capital of Italy, as well as the daily life of ancient Romans from different social classes and backgrounds.

You will learn about their funeral customs, their religious beliefs, their public and private buildings, their artistic skills, and their reuse and reworking of materials over time. The Celio Archaeological Park and Museum is a great place to immerse yourself in the ancient world and appreciate its legacy.

The Garden

Explore the ancient Rome at the new Celio Archaeological Park and Museum 77The Celio Archaeological Park in Rome invites you to discover the ancient history of the city and its culture through a collection of artifacts that span from the Capitoline Collections to the modern capital. You will see the results of the excavations that unearthed a wealth of objects from the new districts and their infrastructures, such as the Esquiline, Quirinal, and Viminal hills. The artifacts are arranged by themes that illustrate the daily life of ancient Rome. You will learn how different social classes expressed their status in the funeral sphere, from simple burial stones to grand tombs of senators like Servius Sulpicius Galba. You will also experience the religious sphere, from humble shrines to the gods of the Roman pantheon to majestic temples like the Temple of Castor in the Roman Forum. You will appreciate the contrast between public and private buildings, as shown by the fragments of various structures in the city, including the bases of statues that honored prominent figures in both spheres. You will also witness the administrative presence of Rome in the territory, from the markers of the Tiber’s riverbed to the extensions of the city’s pomerium, to the signs of the aqueducts’ influence. You will marvel at the architectural taste of the ancients, as revealed by the techniques of construction and decoration for buildings and marble works. Finally, you will explore the theme of reuse and reworking, a phenomenon that continued beyond antiquity and shaped the entire architectural history of the city.

The Museum of the Forma Urbis

Explore the ancient Rome at the new Celio Archaeological Park and Museum 78At the Museum of the Forma Urbis you can see the remains of a huge map of Rome carved on 150 marble slabs between 203 and 211 AD. The map was once displayed in the Temple of Peace, and later moved to the complex of SS. Cosma and Damiano. It is a rare and precious document that shows the ancient cityscape of Rome. The map covered an area of about 18x13m, and showed more than 13,550,000 m2 of the city with detailed engravings of the buildings in Rome, at a scale of about 1:240. The map was not meant to be a practical guide, but a symbol of power and glory, giving a general view of the city and its magnificent monuments, highlighted by the use of color. The map was broken into hundreds of pieces, from 1562 to the most recent discoveries, and only about a tenth of the original map survives, in various states of preservation. Some pieces show whole neighborhoods, houses, porticos, temples, and shops, while others are just small fragments. Only about 200 pieces have been identified and matched with the modern topography. The Museum of the Forma Urbis gives you the opportunity to see the marble map in a new way, both for research and enjoyment. The museum is located in the former Gymnasium of the Italian Youth of the Lictor, which also contains a rich collection of architectural and decorative materials from the Municipal Antiquarium. The pieces of the Forma Urbis are laid on the floors of the rooms, on top of Giovanni Battista Nolli’s Large Map of 1748. You can walk through the ancient city, and admire the floor plans from a close and overhead perspective.

Information:

  • Entrance: Viale del Parco del Celio 20, Viale del Parco del Celio 22, Clivo di Scauro 4
  • Rates:
    • Archaeological Park of the Celio: Free Entry
    • Museum of Forma Urbis:
      • Full Resident €6.50 – Reduced Resident €5.50
      • Full Non-Resident €9.00 – Reduced Non-Resident €6.50
      • Free entry for MIC Roma Card holders
    • Group reservations mandatory, call 060608

Tickets can be purchased online, through the call center 060608 (with a pre-sale fee of €1), or at the museum’s ticket office. On-site ticket purchases for future dates are allowed only with a credit card, with a pre-sale fee of €1.

Opening Hours:

  • Archaeological Park of the Celio: Open from 7:00 to 17:30 (standard time) – from 7:00 to 20:00 (daylight saving time) Closed on December 25 and May 1
  • Museum of Forma Urbis: Tuesday to Sunday from 10:00 to 16:00 Last entry one hour before closing Closed on December 25 and May 1

For More Information: Call 060608 (every day from 9:00 to 19:00)

*Images included in this articles were provided by Zeno Colantoni © Sovrintendenza Capitolina ai Beni Culturali.

 

Read more about: 

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Pay  a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Learn about Rome Winter Sales 2024

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

The residence permit issued for study, internship, training, or waiting for job can now be converted into a permit for self-employed work at any time of the year, thanks to the legislative decree known as “Legge Cutro”.

(DL 20 march n. 23, converted in Legge 5 may 2023 n. 50)

The conversion of the residence permit from study/waiting for job to Self-Employment is possible only if the permit is still valid and has not expired.

The request for conversion can be made even before the end of the course of studies, if you attend university (degree courses, master’s degree or doctorate of research) or if you are already adult on arrival in Italy. In the case of internship or Professional Course or Formation, conversion is possible only after completion.

Requirements for conversion to Self-Employment:

Residence permit issued for study or waiting for job in the course of validity.
Passport
Tax identification number (Codice Fiscale).
Rental Property Contract with Proof of Registration at Agenzia delle Entrate
Italian Electronic Identity Card (CIE).
Certificate (Degree, Master, Specialization, Doctorate, Traineeship Certificate or training course) recognized by the State.
Registration at the competent professional register/licence if necessary.
Certificate/Declaration proving the possession of an annual income from lawful sources (ex. tax return, bank guarantee, balance statement), of an amount exceeding the minimum level laid down by law for exemption from participation in healthcare expenditure (euro 8500,00).
Declaration of the financial parameters, the amount of the minimum economic resources needed to start the activity indicated.
Certificate of Partita IVA.
Membership in the INPS social security fund.
E-mail Address & Pec Email
Housing elegibility issued by the Municipality (RIA).

To convert the study/waiting fot job permit the holder must:

Access (using CIE) the portal of the Ministry of the Interior “Sportello Unico per l’Immigrazione”
•  Fill out the Z2 form, attach all required documents and send the application telematically.
•  At the end of the verification of the application, in the event of a successful outcome, the applicant will receive the clearance (Nulla Osta) through PEC.
The clearance must be handed over to the immigration office to complete the procedure and obtain the residence permit for self-employment.

The “Self-employment” permit has a maximum duration of 2 years and allows the holder to work as a Self-employed.

If you need assistance with this schedule a free call with us at legal@expatslivinginrome.com


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

Guest Article written by Sal from Nature of Sal

 

Love snow? Can’t wait for it to hit? Well, buckle up for a guide on keeping it cool and safe while having a blast in the snowy wonder!

Let’s kick off with some not-so-well-known stuff you should know if you’re up for hiking in the snow (or planning a snowshoeing escapade):

 

Mandatory Winter Tires:

    • In many spots, especially on highways and closer to the mountains, you gotta roll with winter tires, AllSeason rubber, or keep a set of snow chains in the trunk.

 

ARVA Kit – Your Winter Guardian:

Starting January 1, 2022, it’s mandatory to carry an ARVA Kit in Italy. This kit includes a transceiver, probe, and shovel. The law is a bit like abstract art – open to interpretation. Mostly, it’s a must where there’s a hint of an avalanche, real or theoretical. Skip it, and you might end up with a hefty 100€ to 150€ fine.

Check out this ARVA-Kit:

 

Checklist for Snowshoeing:

1. Clothing:
Embrace a practical layering strategy for snowy conditions – initiate with a moisture-wicking base, layer on insulating mid-layers, and conclude with a waterproof outer shell. Additionally, don gaiters to shield the space between your boots and pants, keeping snow out. Ensure your socks are warm and well-fitting, opt for wool or synthetic materials, and carry an extra pair for potential wetness. Equip yourself with waterproof and insulated gloves or mittens; consider adding liners for supplementary warmth and protection. Complete your attire with a hat covering your ears and a neck gaiter or balaclava for facial coverage. These essentials aid in heat retention and prevent frostbite.

2. Accessories:
Enhance your experience by bringing along some accessories for added enjoyment and safety. Here are some examples:

– Sunglasses or goggles that shield your eyes from the sun and snow glare. You can also apply sunscreen and lip balm to prevent sunburn and chapping.

– Opt for a backpack that can accommodate all your gear and supplies. Select a comfortable and durable pack with enough space and compartments tailored to your needs. Alternatively, you can use a sled to transport your gear if you prefer.

3. Winter-Ready Footwear:
Step into winter with snug, waterproof boots. Aim for a balance of chic and practicality, ensuring your winter adventures are both comfortable and stylish.

4. Snowshoes – Your Practical Companions:
Select your snowshoes thoughtfully. They’re your reliable companions for navigating diverse terrains. Avoid unexpected tumbles in the snow by making a sensible choice.

5. Poles:
Poles help you balance, steer, and propel yourself on the snow. They also reduce the stress on your knees and ankles. You can use ski poles or trekking poles with snow baskets, which are wider than regular baskets and prevent the poles from sinking in the snow.

6. Tech-Savvy Navigation:
Equip yourself for snowy landscapes with technology. Whether it’s a map, compass, or GPS, these tools are your allies in navigating the winter wilderness efficiently.

7. Hydration and Nutrition – Winter Essentials:
Combat the cold with warm drinks from a reliable thermos. Pack high-energy snacks to conquer snowy peaks with enthusiasm, focusing on practicality rather than extravagant fuel.

8. Emergency Preparedness:
Your emergency kit is your winter safety net. Include first aid essentials, a multi-tool, and a flashlight – all neatly packed to handle any unexpected turns in your winter adventure.

9. Weather Awareness:
Stay informed about the weather conditions. Regularly check forecasts, stay flexible with plans, and embrace the enchantment of winter in the most favorable conditions.

You can also find a full, interactive checklist for your winter hike here.

For a safe and comfortable experience in the snow, it’s essential to equip yourself with the right gear, knowledge, and attitude. Whether you’re into hiking or snowshoeing, this guide will ensure you’re well-prepared with everything you need.

 

Read more about: 

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Pay  a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Learn about Rome Winter Sales 2024

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

From timeless classics to modern masterpieces, the cinematic portrayal of Italy captures the essence of its beauty and complexity. Let’s explore further into the 10 most acclaimed films that have left an indelible mark on the world of cinema.

La Dolce Vita (1960) – Federico Fellini

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 79

This classic takes us on a mesmerizing journey through the decadent nightlife of Rome, exploring the adventures and romances of a gossip columnist. Fellini’s masterful storytelling and Marcello Mastroianni’s captivating performance make it an enduring masterpiece.

Life is Beautiful (1997) – Roberto Benigni

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 80

A heartwarming and tragic comedy set against the backdrop of the Holocaust, this film tells the story of a Jewish father’s unwavering love and imagination to protect his son. Roberto Benigni’s touching portrayal earned him international acclaim.

The Godfather (1972) – Francis Ford Coppola

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 81

This legendary crime saga needs no introduction. Coppola’s epic masterpiece traces the rise and fall of the Corleone mafia family, spanning across America and Sicily. Marlon Brando’s iconic performance and the film’s cultural impact make it a cinematic landmark.

Roman Holiday (1953) – William Wyler

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 82

A charming romantic comedy featuring Audrey Hepburn as a princess escaping her royal duties to explore Rome with a reporter, played by Gregory Peck. The film’s enchanting storyline and Hepburn’s delightful performance continue to captivate audiences.

Cinema Paradiso (1988) – Giuseppe Tornatore

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 83

This nostalgic drama unfolds in a small Sicilian village, depicting the transformative relationship between a young boy and a projectionist. Giuseppe Tornatore’s heartfelt portrayal of love for cinema earned the film an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

The Bicycle Thief (1948) – Vittorio De Sica

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 84

A neorealist masterpiece, this film explores the struggles of a poor father and son in post-war Rome as they search for a stolen bicycle. Vittorio De Sica’s raw and powerful storytelling remains a cornerstone of Italian cinema.

8 1/2 (1963) – Federico Fellini

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 85

Fellini’s surreal and artistic exploration of the creative and personal crises of a renowned director. The film’s dreamlike sequences and innovative narrative techniques have solidified its status as a cinematic marvel.

The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) – Anthony Minghella

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 86

A psychological thriller set against the backdrop of Italy, the film follows the exploits of a con artist assuming the identity of a wealthy American. Minghella’s direction and the stellar ensemble cast create a gripping tale of deception and intrigue.

Under the Tuscan Sun (2003) – Audrey Wells

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 87

This romantic comedy follows the transformative journey of a divorced writer who purchases a villa in the picturesque landscapes of Tuscany. Audrey Wells’ film captures the beauty of Italian countryside life and self-discovery.

Call Me by Your Name (2017) – Luca Guadagnino

10 Most Acclaimed Films related to Italy 88

A poignant coming-of-age romance set in northern Italy, depicting the summer love affair between a teenager and a graduate student. Luca Guadagnino’s evocative storytelling and the mesmerizing Italian backdrop garnered critical acclaim.
These films not only showcase Italy’s diverse landscapes and cultural richness but also provide a captivating lens through which to explore the complexities of human relationships, societal struggles, and the timeless allure of this beautiful Mediterranean country.

These films not only showcase Italy’s diverse landscapes and cultural richness but also provide a captivating lens through which to explore the complexities of human relationships, societal struggles, and the timeless allure of this beautiful Mediterranean country.

 

Read more about: 

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Pay  a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Learn about Rome Winter Sales 2024

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

A crucial aspect of settling in Italy is obtaining the unique 16-character alphanumeric code known as the Tax Code (Codice Fiscle). In this article, we will delve into the intricacies of acquiring the Tax Code for foreign nationals, addressing different scenarios and specific procedures.

Understanding the Tax Code

The Tax Code serves as a distinctive identifier, encompassing personal data such as the surname, name, date, and place of birth. This 16-character alphanumeric code is pivotal in dealings with public administration and is indispensable for essential services, including registration with the Local Health Authority (ASL) and the selection of a general practitioner.

Acquiring the Tax Code: General Process

For resident citizens, the Tax Code is delivered to their address of residence. Nonresident citizens, on the other hand, receive it at the domicile for tax purposes communicated during the application process.

Tax Code for Foreign Nationals (Non-EU Countries)

Foreign citizens arriving in Italy encounter a streamlined process for obtaining their Tax Code. Those applying for residence permits for employment or family reunification can obtain the code from the Immigration Desk in every Prefecture.

Foreign Nationals Seeking International Protection

For foreign nationals applying for international protection, the Police Headquarters or Border Police assigns the Tax Code. In case of duplicate data, a provisional tax code is issued until the permanent one is obtained from any Revenue Agency office (Agenzia delle Entrate).

Unregistered or Unaccompanied Foreign Minors

Unregistered or unaccompanied foreign minors can obtain a Tax Code through the Revenue Agency, upon request from the Local Health Authority. The code is then communicated to the person with parental responsibility or the individual in charge of the facility hosting the minor.

Special Procedures: Ukrainian Refugees

Ukrainian citizens applying for temporary protection undergo a unique process. The Police Headquarters assigns a permanent tax code during the provisional residence permit application. In cases of duplicate data, a provisional numerical tax code is assigned until individuals secure the permanent code from any Revenue Agency office.

EU Citizens

EU citizens residing in Italy can apply for a tax code by submitting form AA4/8 to a local Revenue Agency office. Alternatively, they may request the tax code at the Italian consular representation in their country of origin. EU citizens can utilize the National Health Service with the health insurance card issued by their country of residence (EHIC – European Health Insurance Card).

 


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Find and Buy Your Ideal Property in Italy with Our Professional Services
Buying Property in Italy – How to Get a Mortgage as a Foreigner
How to Open a Bank Account in Italy as an Expat
Learn Italian and open up new possibilities for your career and personal growth
Prepare for the CILS B1 Citizenship exam to obtain citizenship by marriage, residence or study or work in Italy.
Switching to a self-employment permit from a study or job-seeking one
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy
Red flags to identify a scam when renting in Italy

In Italy, the festive season extends beyond Christmas, culminating in the celebration of Epiphany on January 6th. A central figure in this unique Italian tradition is “La Befana,” a mysterious character that adds an extra touch of enchantment to the holiday season. Let’s explore the origins of La Befana, her fascinating role in Italian folklore, how similar traditions unfold in other parts of the world, and celebrations to welcome La Befana across cities in Italy.

Every year, on the night of January 5, Italian children eagerly await the arrival of La Befana, a kindly old woman who brings them gifts and sweets. According to tradition, she fills the socks of good children with candy and toys, while the bad ones get coal. But who is La Befana, and why is she associated with a witch?

The name La Befana comes from the word Epifania, which is the Italian name for the Feast of Epiphany, a Christian celebration of the visit of the Three Wise Men to the baby Jesus. According to one legend, La Befana was a woman who lived near Bethlehem and was visited by the Three Wise Men on their way to see Jesus. They invited her to join them, but she refused, claiming she was too busy with her housework. Later, she regretted her decision, tried to follow them, but could not find them. She wandered around the world, looking for Jesus and giving gifts to good children along the way.

Another legend says that La Befana was a mother who lost her child and went mad with grief. When she heard about the birth of Jesus, she thought he was her son and went to see him, bringing him gifts. Jesus was happy with her gesture and blessed her, making her the mother of all Italian children.

La Befana is often depicted as a hag riding a broomstick, wearing a black shawl and a patched dress, and carrying a sack of gifts. Covered in soot because she enters houses through the chimney, she is also a good housekeeper, sweeping the floor before she leaves. She fills children’s stockings with candy, fruit, nuts, or toys if they are good, or coal, garlic, or onions if they are bad. Families also prepare a small glass of wine and some food for her.

La Befana is a popular figure in Italian folklore and culture, and her tradition dates back to ancient times when pagan rites of fertility and renewal were celebrated around the winter solstice. Some scholars believe that La Befana is a Christian adaptation of an earlier Roman goddess, Strenia, associated with the new year and the gift of branches. Others suggest that La Befana has Celtic origins, resembling some of their female deities of nature and magic.

La Befana is not the only gift-bringer in Europe. Many other characters play a similar role, such as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, the Christkind, the Yule Goat, and the Three Kings. Each has their own history, customs, and symbols, but they all share the same spirit of generosity, joy, and love.

La Befana’s Celebrations Across Italy

La Befana: Italy's Epiphany Tradition and Celebrations Across Italy 89

La Befana is celebrated in many parts of Italy with festivals, parades, bonfires, and markets. One of the most famous events is held in Piazza Navona in Rome, where a large market offers sweets, toys, decorations, and other items related to La Befana. On January 6, La Befana will arrive at the square at 12:00 and greet the children until 14:00, distributing candy and small gifts to the crowd.

 

Other events in Italy where La Befana will arrive in the year 2024 include:

 

La Befana: Italy's Epiphany Tradition and Celebrations Across Italy 90

1. The Befana Race in Venice, where hundreds of people dressed as La Befana row along the Grand Canal on boats and gondolas. The departure will be at 10:00 AM from S. Tomà to the Rialto Bridge.

 

La Befana: Italy's Epiphany Tradition and Celebrations Across Italy 91

2. The Befana Festival in Urbania, where La Befana has her official home and receives thousands of letters from children every year. The festival features shows, games, workshops, and a giant sock that can hold up to 10,000 gifts. La befana will arrive at 13:00 at Piazza del comune. The entrance fee for those older than 11 years old and non-residents is 6€.

 

La Befana: Italy's Epiphany Tradition and Celebrations Across Italy 92

3. The Befana descends from the Campanile in Pistoia. On January 6th, the meeting point is in Piazza Duomo, where La Befana will descend from the bell tower of the Torre Catilina to distribute gifts and sweets to all children. The entire square will be adorned with 12 large stockings, placed on the walls of the buildings. Access to Piazza Duomo will be allowed exclusively from Ripa della Comunità and via Roma. Starting from 3:00 PM, it will be possible to enter the square for free, up to the limit set by safety regulations.

 

Read more about: 

Italian New Year’s Eve Traditions

Epiphany Festival at Piazza Navona, featuring Activities for Children

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Enjoy the holiday season with a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Visit the exhibition of ‘100 Nativity Scenes in the Vatican’ for FREE

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

In Italy, there are truly many traditions linked to the arrival of the new year. In this article, we will explore some of the most popular ones that make New Year’s Eve unique in the Beautiful Country!

1. La Festa di San Silvestro:

New Year’s Eve in Italy is also widely known as “La Festa di San Silvestro” (The Feast of Saint Sylvester). Families and friends come together for a grand feast, referred to as the “Cenone di Capodanno” (New Year’s Eve Feast), featuring a sumptuous array of dishes. This celebration adds a special touch to the evening, heightening the sense of anticipation and excitement.

The “Cenone di Capodanno” in Italy is characterized by a lavish and diverse spread of dishes. While specific dishes may vary depending on regional traditions and personal preferences, some common elements of the feast include:

– Lentils: Lentils are a symbol of good luck and prosperity in Italian New Year’s Eve traditions. Their round shape is believed to resemble coins, representing wealth and abundance.

– Cotechino e Lenticchie: This traditional dish features a type of pork sausage called Cotechino served with lentils. It is a classic combination believed to bring good fortune and financial success for the coming year.

– Panettone: A sweet bread loaf originating from Milan, Panettone is a quintessential dessert during the holiday season. It is often enjoyed during the Cenone di Capodanno, symbolizing unity and good fortune.

– Zampone: Similar to Cotechino, Zampone is a stuffed pig’s trotter. It is another popular dish served during New Year’s Eve celebrations, particularly in northern regions of Italy.

– Seafood: In coastal areas, seafood dishes are prevalent in the Cenone di Capodanno. Shellfish, fish, and other seafood delicacies are enjoyed, symbolizing abundance and prosperity from the sea.

– Tortellini in Brodo: In some regions, particularly in northern Italy, families may start their New Year’s Eve feast with Tortellini in Brodo, which is small pasta filled with meat or cheese served in a flavorful broth.

– Pandoro: Another sweet bread alternative to Panettone, Pandoro is popular in the northern regions of Italy, especially in Verona and the Veneto region. It is often dusted with powdered sugar, resembling the snowy landscape of winter.

– Prosecco and Sparkling Wines: A celebratory toast with Prosecco or other sparkling wines is an integral part of the Cenone di Capodanno, marking the transition to the new year with joy and festivity.

These are just a few examples, and the actual menu can vary based on local traditions and personal preferences.

2. Fireworks Illumination:

As the clock approaches midnight on New Year’s Eve in Italy, the sky lights up with a breathtaking fireworks show. The widespread tradition of celebrating with fireworks creates a spectacular display, welcoming the new year. Despite occasional bursts heard even a week before December 31st, some cities have opted to ban fireworks, recognizing environmental concerns and their impact on animals.

3. The Red Wardrobe:

On New Year’s Eve, the color red takes center stage, symbolizing luck, prosperity, and fertility. Italians customarily don red attire, often choosing intimate apparel, to attract positive energies. Enhancing this auspicious theme, many also adorn their nails with vibrant red nail polish.

4. Midnight Feasts of Fortune:

The stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve marks a moment of symbolic feasting for Italians. Consuming lentils and grapes is a cherished tradition believed to bring luck and prosperity for the upcoming year. Each lentil represents financial fortune, while every grape eaten signifies good fortune and wealth.

5. New Year’s Wishes and Kisses:

The magic of New Year’s Eve unfolds with heartfelt wishes exchanged at the stroke of midnight. A tender kiss on the cheek, shared with someone of the opposite sex, is a tradition symbolizing luck and fostering positive beginnings and connections.

6. Discarding the Old:

In various regions of Italy, it’s common to bid farewell to the past by discarding old objects. This symbolic act represents leaving behind the old and embracing the future with optimism, expecting the best from the new year.

7. Outdoor Activities:

In some regions, the brave partake in the “polar bear plunge” or “Nuoto di Capodanno,” a tradition involving a refreshing dip in icy waters. This invigorating act is believed to cleanse the body and spirit, symbolizing a fresh start to the new year.

 

As Italy welcomes the new year, these traditions, including the unique celebration of La Festa di San Silvestro and invigorating outdoor activities, weave a vibrant tapestry of culture, symbolism, and shared joy, making Capodanno a truly special and unforgettable celebration.

 

Read more about: 

A Guide to New Year’s Eve and the First Week of January 2024 in Rome

Epiphany Festival at Piazza Navona, featuring Activities for Children

Free exhibitions across a series of civic museums in Rome on January 1, 2024

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Enjoy the holiday season with a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Visit the exhibition of ‘100 Nativity Scenes in the Vatican’ for FREE

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

ACTIVITIES FOR BOTH KIDS AND ADULTS

UNTIL JANUARY 7TH

 

– Experience a Contemporary Circus Performance featuring Aerial Acrobatics:

Witness a contemporary circus performance filled with acrobatics presented by Circus “El Grito.” Embracing the vibrant tradition of the circus, they infuse it with a modern twist. Their shows seamlessly blend elements of circus, dance, music, and theater, offering a unique and dynamic spectacle at Auditorium Parco della Musica. Purchase your tickets here.

 

– Visit ‘Lights in Nature‘ in the stunning Brancaccio Gardens:

Step into the enchanting world of ‘LIFE’ as the renowned lighting event makes its debut in Italy, gracing the city of Rome and casting its luminous spell over the Brancaccio Gardens from December 14, 2023, to February 18, 2024. As night falls, the magic unfolds, offering a captivating experience to be shared with loved ones. Embark on a nocturnal journey through a realm inhabited by marvelous creatures, where light takes center stage. The Giardini Brancaccio provides the magical backdrop for this unique event.

Opening its gates from January 1st to February 18th, with varying access times, this spectacle welcomes all, including wheelchair users, individuals with reduced mobility, and families with pushchairs. Click here for more information.

 

– Threads of Light (Trame di Luce) at Rome Botanical Garden:
Trame di Luce” transforms the Botanical Garden in Rome into a captivating stage for the dazzling event of the Italian winter featuring installations and luminous artworks by national and international artists, creating a unique experience for visitors starting from November 16 in Rome and lasting until January 7, 2024. It offers an enchanting winter walk through historic outdoor locations in Rome highlighting beauty and fairytale scenarios. An immersive experience from illuminated woods to magical caves and light tunnels, the event captivates both young and old. After the visit, the delightful “Luci di Gusto” area awaits visitors who want to enjoy a post-visit gastronomic experience.

 

Epiphany Festival at Piazza Navona, featuring activities for children:

Experience a variety of storybook readings, workshops, games, and shows specially designed for children in English, French, Spanish, and LIS (Italian Sign Language). Each day offers a unique experience, from the heartwarming “Feliz Navidad” on December 26 to the imaginative “Du charbon et des bonbons” on January 6. Click here for more information.

 

The Fantastic Castle of Santa Claus at Lunghezza Castle:

Embark on a enchanting Christmas journey at the fantastic Castle of Santa Claus! With the purchase of an entrance ticket, you gain access to the hidden chambers of Santa Claus within Lunghezza Castle. The park offers complimentary performances that vary under the artistic direction’s discretion, ensuring a magical experience at the Castle of Santa Claus. Delight in grand shows, special events, encounters, magic, acrobatics, and more. The castle’s events include the Throne Room with Santa Claus in Person, the Cheerful Post Office, the Toy Factory, the Snow Fairy, the Elf Village, Santa Claus’s Apartments, Santa Claus’s Art Gallery, Spot the Grinch, and Santa Claus’s Grand Sleigh. Meanwhile, park events feature captivating elements such as “Atmo…Spheres,” A Christmas in the Kingdom of Frozen, Dances with Elves, and the Cheerful Polar Bears, among others. Kids can send their letters to Santa Claus via email, with the anticipation of finding them on the wish board in the Toy Factory when they visit the castle. Don’t miss this captivating opportunity at the Fantastic Castle!

 

The Christmas Village at Santa Severa Castle:

Embark on a magical journey at the Santa Severa Castle’s Christmas Village near Rome, Italy, from December 8th to January 7th. This festive celebration transforms the castle into a captivating space, offering enchanting experiences for visitors of all ages. With luminous installations, creative workshops, a Christmas market, and captivating performances, the castle becomes a refuge of holiday emotions. This event provides continuous, high-quality entertainment for families during the holiday season. Discover artisan markets, Santa’s House, the Befana’s House, an Innovation Lab, an Enchanted Forest, and a Fantastic Theater, all contributing to the festive atmosphere. Accessible by train from Rome to ‘Santa Severa’ station, the castle awaits with varied ticket prices, including free entry for kids under 6, €3 for ages 7 to 12, and €6 for 13 years and above. Special discounts are available, and a combined museum and village ticket offers a great family deal. Explore this magical Christmas outing, complete with ample parking, designated refreshment areas, and open daily from 10:30 am to 7:30 pm, with special hours on select days. In case of bad weather, performances move indoors.

 

Christmas World at Villa Borghese:
It celebrates the enchanting Christmas atmospheres, immersing the audience in a journey through the iconic views of different cities around the world, masterfully reproduced by Italian set designers and artists. This year, the event will unfold over an area of over 60,000 square meters, and each city will have its own dedicated food district. This event will take place from December 1, 2023, to January 7, 2024.

 

– Christmas Village at Cinecittà World:
Cinecittà World in Rome transforms into a festive Christmas Village from November 11, 2023, to January 7, 2024. The event features Christmas markets on Christmas Street, reminiscent of 1920s New York, offering typical Christmas treats amid cinematic scenographies. The day begins with the Christmas Show at 11 am, leading to evening attractions, including the Christmas Musical at Theater 4. The Festival of Lights, Stardust, offers a captivating path through Christmas lights, decorations, and cinematic scenes, accompanied by the Cinema Drops display on a water maxi-screen. Visitors can experience traditional activities such as meeting Santa Claus, exploring his house, and witnessing the Cinema Nativity Scene. The Kingdom of Ice provides a unique indoor snow park experience, featuring activities like traditional ice skating, thrilling slides, and a winter playground. The immersive Digital Circus in Wonderland takes place on weekends, offering a blend of colors, lights, and projections. On December 25, the park opens with Christmas Mass, Lunch, Shows, and Attractions for all ages, including the debut of Christmas On Ice with 51 performers showcasing festive choreographies and music. The grand finale occurs on December 31 with the largest New Year’s Eve celebration in Italy at Cinecittà World, featuring themed dinners, attractions, concerts, live performances, and midnight fireworks, open from 6 pm to 6 am. The season concludes with a Befana weekend full of surprises.

 

 

Read more about: 

Italian New Year’s Eve Traditions

Epiphany Festival at Piazza Navona, featuring Activities for Children

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

Enjoy the holiday season with a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Visit the exhibition of ‘100 Nativity Scenes in the Vatican’ for FREE

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

Italy, known for its rich cultural heritage and deep-rooted traditions, comes alive with unique and heartwarming customs during the Christmas season. Here are some cherished Italian Christmas traditions that add magic to the holiday festivities.

 

1. Nativity Scenes (Presepe):

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 93
Nativity scenes are an integral part of Italian Christmas decor. Italians take pride in creating intricate presepi, or nativity scenes, often featuring not only the Holy Family but also an entire village with shepherds, farmers, and bakers. Many cities host competitions for the most elaborate and creative nativity scenes.

 

2. Feast of the Seven Fishes (La Vigilia):

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 94
On Christmas Eve, many Italians celebrate La Vigilia, the Feast of the Seven Fishes. This tradition involves indulging in a sumptuous seafood feast with a variety of fish dishes. The number seven is thought to symbolize the seven sacraments or the seven days of creation.

 

3. Christmas Lunch:

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 95

On Christmas lunch in Italy, celebrated on December 25th, families come together for a feast that can last for hours. The Christmas menu, steeped in tradition, boasts richness with an array of appetizers, regional pasta delights such as cappelletti, agnolotti, or ravioli, and a splendid selection of roasted meats. Christmas lunch typically commences with a classic antipasto featuring cured meats, adorned with olives and cheese. In the North, a diverse array of appetizers is customary. Pasta offerings include oven-baked lasagna, prevalent in the central-southern regions, while the North highlights green lasagna alla bolognese and various stuffed pastas like cannelloni, ravioli, or trotellini, adorned with béchamel and ragù.

For the main course, meat takes center stage: roast veal, prized Galician blonde beef, braised beef, or roasted chicken with potatoes. Desserts encompass the Italian Christmas sweets, including Pandoro, whose recipe originated in the Venice/Veneto area, and Panettone.

 

4. Zampognari and Pifferai:

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 96
In some regions, you may encounter Zampognari and Pifferai, traditional Italian bagpipers and flute players. These musicians dress in historic costumes and travel from town to town, playing festive tunes that evoke the spirit of Christmas.

 

5. La Befana:

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 97
La Befana is an iconic figure in Italian folklore, often referred to as the Christmas witch. According to legend, she visits children on the night of January 5th, leaving sweets for good children and coal for the naughty ones. Many towns host parades featuring La Befana.

 

6. Tombola:

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 98
Tombola is an Italian version of bingo played during the Christmas season. Families gather to play this festive game, and winning numbers are often called out in regional dialects, adding a touch of local flair.

 

7. Midnight Mass (La Messa di Mezzanotte):

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 99
Attending Midnight Mass, known as La Messa di Mezzanotte, is a significant Christmas Eve tradition. Many Italians, whether religious or not, participate in this solemn and joyous occasion, celebrating the birth of Christ.

 

8. Panettone and Pandoro:

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 100
Christmas in Italy is incomplete without indulging in the delicious sweet bread known as panettone or its golden, star-shaped counterpart, pandoro. These festive treats are enjoyed with a cup of hot chocolate or a glass of prosecco.

 

9. San Nicola, Santa Lucia, and Babbo Natale

Italian Christmas Traditions You Should Know 101

During the Christmas festivities in Italy, children eagerly await the arrival of Babbo Natale; “Babbo Natale” is the Italian equivalent of Santa Claus. In some Northern Italian regions, gifts are received on December 6th, the feast day of Saint Nicholas. In other cities like Bergamo and Verona, tradition has it that children anxiously anticipate the morning of December 13th, hoping to find their desired gifts upon waking. A week before this joyful morning, children write letters to Santa Lucia, expressing their good behavior and requesting the gifts they wish to receive. To thank the saint, on the night between December 12th and 13th, children prepare a bowl of flour for the donkey, a cup of coffee for Santa Lucia, some bread for her coachman, and a plate with cookies, wine, nougat, and fruit. Children must be careful not to be too curious, pretending not to see Santa at work. Upon waking, in addition to gifts, they also discover sweets.

Babbo Natale is undoubtedly the primary gift-bringer in Italy. Some children eagerly anticipate Christmas Eve, as gifts might magically appear under the tree at midnight. In other families, gifts arrive on the morning of December 25th.

 

Embracing these Italian Christmas traditions offers a glimpse into the warmth and joy that define the holiday season in this culturally rich country. Whether it’s enjoying traditional dishes, crafting detailed nativity scenes, or sharing laughter during a game of Tombola, the spirit of Christmas in Italy is truly magical.

 

Read more about: 

A Guide to Christmas in Rome

Christmas markets featuring artisanal products in Rome

Enjoy the holiday season with a visit to Rome’s ice skating rinks

Visit the exhibition of ‘100 Nativity Scenes in the Vatican’ for FREE

A Guide to Public Transportation in Rome – Dec. 2023

Italy’s Most Famous Christmas Markets

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the first Sunday of each month

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

Plan your visits to the Vatican Museums with the latest changes coming into effect on January 1, 2024. In anticipation of the significant 2025 Jubilee event and aiming to enhance the accessibility and experiential quality of the pontifical collections, the Directorate of the Museums and Cultural Heritage is implementing substantial modifications to the existing public admission policies. These adjustments address critical issues that have arisen in the aftermath of the pandemic-related tourism recovery.

Starting from January 1, 2024, the new measures will be in place. To better distribute attendance across an extended timeframe for improved visit quality and safety, the daily opening hours will be extended. The museums will be open to all from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., with the last entry at 5:00 p.m.

During the high tourist season, beginning in March, there will be further extensions on Fridays and Saturdays, as well as specified days, until 8:00 p.m., with the last entry at 6:00 p.m.

In line with this approach, a group size limit will be implemented, allowing each accredited tour guide to have a maximum of 20 visitors.

A new ticketing system, guided by principles of transparency and efficiency, will provide solutions for individuals, pilgrims, families, schools, and sector operators, ensuring everyone’s specific needs are addressed. Special measures will be taken to combat secondary ticketing and automated ticket purchasing (BOT), involving IT measures and the introduction of nominative tickets, accompanied by thorough identity checks.

Additionally, a comprehensive project is underway to progressively introduce air conditioning to all exhibition rooms, prioritizing the health and well-being of visitors.

These innovations are part of a broader reorganization of the management and reception policies of the Vatican Museums, aligning with their identity and mission to effectively balance the protection and conservation of artworks with the accessibility needs of the general public.

 

Read more about: 

Free entry to museums and archaeological sites in Italy on the 1st Sunday of each month

15 Must-Visit Museums, Galleries, and Cultural Sites in Italy

A Comprehensive Guide to Visiting the Vatican Museums: Art, History, and Skip-the-Line Tips

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

The initiative of taxi/NCC travel vouchers restarts with the reactivation of tariff facilitations for taxi and chauffeur services through the issuance of travel vouchers, for the period December 8, 2023 – December 31, 2023. These are directed towards adults and individuals with certified disabilities by the competent medical commission, falling under the categories specified in Annex 3 of DPCM 159/2013, who are currently not benefiting from additional economic incentives provided by Rome Capital.

Tariff Facilitation

For Adults
Enjoy a 50% discount on the cost of a single ride (up to a maximum of €20) when using Rome Capital-licensed Taxi/NCC services. The capped benefit reaches up to €400 for your trips.

For Individuals with Disabilities
Benefit from a 100% discount on the cost of a single ride (up to a maximum of €40), with the same €400 cap. New registrants, who did not participate in the initiative last year, need to submit a medical-legal certification within 15 days of registration to buoniviaggioroma@romamobilita.it to confirm eligibility for the disability category.

Key Initiative Criteria

1. Maximum reimbursement of €400 per month per individual beneficiary.
2. Exact reimbursement of 50% of the taxi/NCC single ride fare (for fares up to €40) for adults.
3. Exact reimbursement of 100% of the taxi/NCC single ride fare (for fares up to a maximum of €40) for individuals with disabilities.
4. Reimbursement for a maximum of 2 rides per day.
5. Obligation for customers to pay the non-reimbursable portion of the fare to the taxi/NCC operator via electronic payment methods.
6. The travel voucher cannot be used with a non-line public transportation operator with whom the beneficiary has direct or collateral familial relationships up to the 4th degree.

How to Access the Service

Eligible citizens can easily register on the BUONI VIAGGIO ROMA initiative portal through SPID, CIE, or CNS. Whether on a smartphone or desktop, visit the website buoniviaggioroma.romamobilita.it. A One-Time Password will be sent to the device, allowing users to set a password for future access and service usage.

Note: For those already registered in 2021/2022, access directly with old credentials or reset the password independently through the “reset password” link.

Operational Information

1. Registration on the buoniviaggioroma.romamobilita.it website:
Click on “ACCEDI AL SERVIZIO” and proceed with registration using SPID, CIE, or CNS credentials.

2. Request for Buono Viaggio Roma:
Activate the Buono Viaggio for each individual trip (max 2 vouchers per day). Details of the voucher (Qrcode and PNR) will be received via SMS, to be used by 24:00 on the same day.

3. Request for a Taxi/Ncc accredited to the service:
Ensure the operator has joined the Buoni Viaggio Roma initiative when calling a Taxi or Ncc.

4. Display the voucher at the end of the ride:
Show the Taxi/Ncc driver the Qrcode and PNR received via SMS. The driver will take note and enter the total amount of the ride. The system will indicate the value of the Buono Viaggio assigned (50% of the rental cost, up to a maximum of €20) until the monthly cap is exhausted. The remaining amount of the ride must be paid with a credit card/debit card.

For information or assistance, reach out to the Mobility helpline at 0657003 from Monday to Friday, from 8:00 to 18:00.

 

Read More:

Navigating public transportation in Rome in December 2023

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

In response to the potential risks associated with snow and ice, Order No. 131, issued by the Mayor of Rome on December 5, 2023, has implemented ‘Emergency Provisions for Snowfall, Ice Formation, and Cold Waves 2023–2024.’ Understanding and adopting proper self-protection behaviors are crucial to preventing associated risks.

 

Before:

– Stay informed about meteorological conditions through radio, television, and the web.

– Equip yourself with necessary snow and ice tools; a shovel and salt supplies are essential for your home or business.

– In the event of a sudden temperature drop below zero degrees Celsius, protect the external water meter from the cold using insulating materials. Keep only the tap for drinking water open (a slight flow is sufficient) closest to the meter to prevent freezing and subsequent pipe breakage. Keep heating systems operational to prevent pipe breakage.

– Install winter tires on your car or carry snow chains, preferably those with quick installation. Check the battery status and the efficiency of windshield wipers, ensuring there is antifreeze in the radiator water.

 

During:

– Clear snow from your private access or driveway. Property owners and managers must keep sidewalks in front of buildings clear during and after snowfall, up to a width of two meters.

– Avoid using two-wheeled transportation.

– Limit travel to essential trips and, when possible, prefer public transportation.

– Do not walk near trees and pay particular attention to snow slabs that, especially during the thaw phase, can detach from roofs.

 

After:

– Note that after a snowfall, ice may form on roads and sidewalks. Pay attention to road conditions and drive with extra caution.

– If walking, choose anti-slip shoes to prevent falls and slips. Exercise caution as ice may be hidden under a layer of soft snow.

 

For any clarifications, information, and/or interventions, contact the 24/7 Operational Room of the Civil Protection of Rome Capital at the toll-free number 800 854 854 or at +39 06 67109200.

 

Don’t forget to check out our Social Media accounts and Subscribe to our Newsletter so you can be updated with information customized for people who want to move, live, and love Italy! Also, check out these unique tours in Rome.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
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Discover the three central Starbucks locations in the heart of Rome that cater to your cravings.

Starbucks Stores in the Center of Rome 102

 

Starbucks Piazza Montecitorio

– Address: Via della Guglia 56°-57-58-59, 00186 Roma
– Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

In the historical center of Rome, Starbucks Piazza Montecitorio offers a unique experience with its two floors and 80 seats, providing a spectacular view of the Chamber of Deputies. Whether you’re a tourist or a local, you can enjoy your favorite Starbucks treats on the comfortable lower floor or the upper floor, which offers a quieter space.

 

Starbucks Stazione Roma Termini

– Address: Piazza dei Cinquecento, 00185 Roma
– Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Conveniently situated at Termini Station, Starbucks welcomes tourists, commuters, and locals alike. There are two Starbucks in the station: one located on the terrace above the train station and the other one on the ground floor.

 

Starbucks Rome Cola di Rienzo

– Address: Via Cola di Rienzo, 23, 00192 Roma
– Opening Times: Monday – Sunday, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

This location, set in the residential Prati neighborhood, distinguishes itself from the hustle and bustle of Parliament Square, offering a more relaxed environment. Making it an ideal spot for a leisurely breakfast or an afternoon pick-me-up.

 

Starbucks in Rome isn’t just about the coffee – it’s a lifestyle. With an extensive menu featuring bakery items, salads, and delectable desserts, there’s something for everyone. So, whether you’re seeking a cozy corner to work, a place to unwind with friends, or simply a taste of home, Starbucks in the center of Rome has got you covered.

 

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Read more:

Starbucks opens in the heart of rome, offering both traditional italian coffee drinks and its signature coffee drinks.


FAQs for Italian Citizenship by Marriage (2023)
Understanding the Tessera Sanitaria: Your Italian Health Insurance Card
Non-Married Partners: How to Obtain a Residence Permit in Italy as De Facto Cohabitants
How to get tax identification number for foreign citizens (Codice Fiscale)
How to register in Italy as an EU citizen
Mastering Public Transport in Italy
The Advantages of Dual Citizenship with an Italian Passport: Unlocking Boundless Opportunities
What you need to know about Visas and Permits to stay in Italy

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